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Article

Native American (Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa Nation, Ojibwe), 20th century, female.

Born 1967, in Michigan.

Black ash basket weaver, painter.

Kelly Jean Church received an Associate of Arts degree from the Institute of American Indian Studies in 1996, a Bachelor of Arts degree in painting/sculpture from the University of Michigan in ...

Article

Joellen Secondo

English designer and writer. He was educated in France and Germany, but his interest in design was provided by visits to the South Kensington Museum, London (now the Victoria & Albert Museum). In 1865 he entered the office of Lavers & Barraud, glass painters and designers. Some time later he became keeper of cartoons at ...

Article

A. Ziffer

German designer, painter, teacher and theorist. A self-taught artist, he made several study trips to Italy and the Tyrol. In painting he found inspiration in late German Romanticism, before turning to the English Arts and Crafts Movement. His designs were exhibited in 1899 at the exhibition of the Bayerische Kunstgewerbeverein (Munich, Glaspal.) and in ...

Article

Rosamond Allwood

Scottish designer, Botanist and writer. He trained at the Government School of Design, Somerset House, London, between 1847 and 1854, during which time he was strongly influenced by the design reform efforts of Henry Cole, Richard Redgrave and Owen Jones. In 1854 he began to lecture at the school on botany and in ...

Article

E. A. Christensen

English designer and painter. He was the son of George Haité, a textile designer. Among his numerous publications on design, the most important is Plant Studies for Artists, Designers, etc. (London, 1884). Comprised of 50 plates of plant ornament, the book also contains a detailed life history of each plant. Using conventionalized motifs derived from a study of nature and Japanese art, he created ceiling designs for ...

Article

S. Kontha

Hungarian painter, illustrator, mosaicist, tapestry designer, stage designer, poster designer, printmaker, sculptor, teacher and administrator. From 1922 to 1929 he studied at the Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts (Magyar Kepzőmüvészeti Főiskolá) in Budapest under Gyula Rudnay (1878–1957) and János Vaszary (1867–1939). In the mid-1920s he became acquainted with Béla Uitz’s ...

Article

Anna Rowland

Swiss painter, textile designer, teacher, writer and theorist. He trained first as a primary school teacher in Berne (1904–6), where he became familiar with progressive educational and psychoanalytical ideas. He was, however, interested in art and music, and in 1909 he decided to become a painter. He enrolled at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Geneva but was so disappointed that he returned to teacher training in Berne. He read widely and developed an interest in religion and mystic philosophy. After qualifying he returned to Geneva and greatly enjoyed the course on the geometric elements of art run by the Swiss painter ...

Article

French painter, illustrator and writer. He began his studies in Rouen and, at 17, won first prize for drawing at the city’s Académie. Shortly afterwards he travelled to Paris, entering the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture as a student of Jean-Baptiste-Marie Pierre. In ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 October 1865, in Bromberg (now Bydgoszcz, Poland); died 24 July 1908, in Schlachtensee (Berlin).

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman, engraver, illustrator, decorative designer, writer. Landscapes, landscapes with figures, waterscapes. Posters, designs for carpets, designs for tapestries, designs (wallpapers/book-binding)...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Active in Paris.

Born 10 July 1935, in Paris.

Painter, hand-weaver, art writer.

Jacques Levant defined his painting as 'a synthesis between the Oriental sign and Western ideas of painting to create a new dynamism'. He also executed coloured compositions in the form of tapestries created using woollen threads glued onto a surface....

Article

English museum curator. In 1905 he joined the Victoria and Albert Museum in London as an Assistant in the Department of Textiles; subsequently he moved to the Department of Architecture and Sculpture. His lifelong career at the Museum was interrupted during World War I, by a period of service (...

Article

Native American (Tongva-Acjachemen), 20th–21st century, female.

Born 1952, in California.

Painter, writer, tribal scholar, cartoonist, basket weaver, illustrator, indigenous language activist.

As cofounder of Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival, L. Frank Manriquez, a California Indian artist and activist, has become particularly associated with the movement for language revitalisation and recovery of indigenous knowledge in the state. A multi-talented figure with a gift for humour, especially in her cartoon works, she has exhibited nationally and internationally, and is a board member of the Cultural Conservancy, supporting indigenous rights, self-determination and the protection of native lands. She also makes and teaches about baskets and is a board member of the California Indian Basketweavers Association. As the author of ...

Article

Pamela Gerrish Nunn

Needlewoman and writer. Second daughter of William Morris and Jane Morris. Brought up in central London, and then west London, she was educated at home until 1874. Her aptitude for art surfaced in her teens and she attended South Kensington School of Design from 1880 to 1883...

Article

Peter Stansky

English designer, writer and activist. His importance as both a designer and propagandist for the arts cannot easily be overestimated, and his influence has continued to be felt throughout the 20th century. He was a committed Socialist whose aim was that, as in the Middle Ages, art should be for the people and by the people, a view expressed in several of his writings. After abandoning his training as an architect, he studied painting among members of the Pre-Raphaelites. In ...

Article

Athena S. E. Leoussi

French painter, illustrator, stage designer, tapestry designer and writer of Greek descent. He moved to Paris in 1922, registered at the Sorbonne in 1932 and briefly attended the studio of the French painter Clement Serveau (b 1886). Through his father’s literary interests he became acquainted with Surrealism, meeting Paul Eluard, André Breton, Salvador Dalí and others in ...

Article

Yuka Kadoi

American art historian , specializing in medieval Islamic textiles. Having studied at the University of Michigan under Mehmet Ağa-Oğlu and R. Ettinghausen (BA 1939; MA 1940), Shepherd enrolled at the Institute of Fine Arts of New York University to conduct further research on Hispano-Islamic textiles. In ...

Article

El Hadji Sy

Senegalese painter, tapestry designer, and administrator. Along with Iba N’Diaye (1928–2008), he is considered a pioneer of Senegalese painting. After receiving a scholarship to study architecture in France, he studied painting at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, and tapestry, ceramics, and graphic arts at the Centre Pedagogie Artistique, Sèvres. In ...

Article

Italian, 17th century, male.

Born c. 1583, in Coreggio; died c. 1650, in Rome.

Painter, fresco artist, draughtsman, engraver (etching), calligrapher, miniaturist, decorative designer, writer. Religious subjects, figures, genre scenes. Designs (embroidery).

Giovanni Luigi Valesio, the son of a Spanish soldier, began his colourful and varied career as a dancer, later becoming a decorative painter. In 1610, he became a pupil of Ludovico Carracci, who encouraged and developed his talent as a miniaturist, fresco artist and draughtsman. He is recorded as being in Rome in 1621, where he produced a series of remarkable embroidery designs for the Countess Lodovisi. He was also secretary to Cardinal Lodovisi, from whom he received a number of important commissions when the latter became pope, as Gregory XV....

Article

Pat Gilmour

American painter, printmaker, tapestry designer, writer and lecturer. She left school at 15 to become a painter, using her given names, June Claire, but her reputation was made after her marriage, when she became June Wayne. Her first exhibition, in 1935, of watercolours based on Ben Day dots, took place a quarter of a century before the birth of Pop art and won her an official invitation to Mexico. Pursuing a rich diversity of ideas, fashionable and unfashionable, she often anticipated aesthetic developments. For example, her spatial constructions of ...