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Article

Ukrainian, 20th century, male.

Born 1914, in Kiev; died 2000.

Painter. Scenes with figures, landscapes, still-lifes.

Max Birstein studied at the institute of arts in Moscow with Sergei Gerasimov. A socialist realist to begin with, he then changed style, moving towards a Post-Impressionism along the lines of his elders, Robert Falk and Atychler. Birstein mounted many collective and solo exhibitions since ...

Article

Sergey Kuznetsov

Russian writer and critic. Early in his career he worked as an art critic for the Nizhegorodskiy Listok and published several articles (May–Sept, 1896) on the All-Russian Industrial and Art Exhibition in Nizhny Novgorod in 1896. His aesthetic principles were very significantly influenced by the ‘philosophy of life’ of Friedrich Nietzsche, but on the other hand he borrowed heavily from the ‘revolutionary democratic aesthetics’ proposed by V. G. Belinsky, N. A. Dobroliubov and N. G. Chernyshevsky. He regarded as great art academic-style paintings that were intelligible to the people, and he opposed the ‘decadent’ and ‘antisocial’, which he saw in much new art, not least the work of Mikhail Vrubel’. Gor’ky’s interest in politics was evident in both his writing (e.g. the novel ...

Article

Christina Lodder

Russian painter. He was trained in the 19th-century Realist tradition of the Wanderers and became one of the most important artists in establishing Socialist Realism as the official art of the USSR. He studied with Pyotr Kelin in 1912 and at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture (...

Article

John E. Bowlt

Russian sculptor. From 1892 to 1896 he attended the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, where he studied under Sergey Volnukhin (1859–1921), and from 1899 to 1902 he attended the St Petersburg Academy of Arts, studying under Vladimir Beklemishev (1861–1920). He moved quickly from the academic lessons of these teachers, reflected in such pieces as ...

Article

Christina Lodder

Russian printmaker and sculptor, active in England. He trained at the Moscow State Art Studios in 1942–7 and at the Moscow Art School (1950–51) in the atmosphere of Socialist Realism. After his national service (1953–6) he studied at the Moscow Animated Film Studios (...

Article

John E. Bowlt

Russian painter. After studying at various private art schools, including those of Lev Dmitriyev-Kavkazsky (1849–1916) in St Petersburg and Konstantin Yuon in Moscow, he enrolled in 1906 at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, where his principal teacher was Konstantin Korovin. Kuprin quickly became acquainted with contemporary developments in painting, thanks especially to his exposure to the collections of French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works owned by Ivan Morosov and Sergey Shchukin and also the international exhibitions organized by the journal ...

Article

Russian painter and designer. He attended the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture in 1881–90, studying under Vladimir Makovsky, Vasily Polenov and Illarion Pryanishnikov, and joined the Wanderers (Peredvizhniki) in 1891. At first Malyutin supported the traditions of narrative Realism, as is clear from paintings such as ...

Article

Sergey Kuznetsov

Georgian sculptor. He was born into a family of artists: his father was a wood-carver, his brother Vasily a painter. From 1895 he studied at the Odessa school of drawing and first tried his hand at sculpture in 1896. The sculptor Georgy Gabashvili gave him encouragement, and shortly afterwards Nikoladze went to Paris, where he studied under ...

Article

Russian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Painter.

Socialist Realism.

St Petersburg (Mus. of the History of the Revolutionary Movement in 1880-1890): Lenin

Article

Sergey Kuznetsov

Belarusian painter. After studying under Boris Gershovich and then under Pavel Chistyakov (1832–1919) at the St Petersburg Academy of Arts (1882–5), he founded his own art school in Viciebsk, where his pupils included Marc Chagall and Solomon Yudovin. The school paved the way for the intense artistic activity in Viciebsk in ...

Article

Soviet architect. He was one of the most prolific architects working in the monumental style of Socialist Realism promoted by Joseph Stalin. He studied at the Leningrad Art-Technical Institute under Ivan Fomin, and he then assisted Vladimir Shchuko in his competition entry (1933) for the Palace of the Soviets, Moscow, a fantastic confection in a neo-Byzantine style. His own work at the time was more restrained; for example, a block of flats (...

Article

Radomíra Sedláková

Czech architect. He graduated in architecture from the Czech Technical University, Prague, in 1949, beginning his career during the period of Socialist Realism. He then began to use new materials and structural elements; for example, his Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry (1963), Prague, introduced a light curtain wall and a typical plan (low and wide entrance hall, with conference rooms, halls and restaurant, and high-rise office building) that was subsequently widely adopted by architects in Czechoslovakia. Other examples of his innovative structural designs include the use of Vierendeel bridge trusses in his extension (...

Article

Catherine Cooke

Russian architect, urban planner and restorer, of Moldovan birth. Although by nature a historicist, to whom undecorated Modernism was a response to poverty rather than an aim in itself, he came to occupy a central position in the formative years of Soviet Modernist architecture during the 1920s. His own best works, however, date in general from the periods before the Revolution of ...

Article

Russian, 20th century, male.

Born 1927; died 1989.

Painter. Nudes, scenes with figures.

Socialist Realism.

Vladimir Skriabin was an academic, post-impressionist painter. He studied under Boris Ioganson at the Repin Institute in Leningrad (now St Petersburg) and was a member of the USSR Artists Union and a People's Artist. He exhibited both at home and abroad after ...

Article

David Elliott and Piotr Juszkiewicz

Term used to describe the idealization of the dictatorship of the proletariat in the arts, apparently first used in the Soviet journal Literaturnaya Gazeta on 25 May 1932. After the cultural pluralism of the 1920s in the Soviet Union, and in line with the objectives of the Five-year plans, art was subordinated to the needs and dictates of the Communist Party. In ...

Article

Yekaterina Andreyeva

Term used from 1972 to describe a style of unofficial art that flourished in the USSR from c. 1970 to c. 1985–8. The term itself is formed from the first syllable of Sotsialisticheskiy realizm (Rus.: ‘Socialist Realism’) and the second word of Pop art and is attributed to the art historian ...

Article

Russian, 20th century, male.

Born 1900, in Ramushevo (Novgorod).

Sculptor.

Nikolai Vasilevich Tomski studied at the Leningrad Vkhutein. He was a sculptor of the Socialist Realist school, and one of his more spectacular works was the 60 feet (18 metre) high Lenin Memorial in Berlin (...

Article

Stephan von Wiese

German sculptor and stage designer. He studied painting at the Kunstakademie in Berlin-Weissensse (1949–53), working first in the style of Socialist Realism. During his period at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf he undertook self-imposed repetitive exercises such as archery, and he modelled his first relief-form paintings by hand. In ...

Article

Lithuanian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 10 January 1869, in Vilnius; died 1947, in Leningrad (now St Petersburg).

Painter. History painting.

Socialist Realism.

Ivan Vladimirov studied at the fine art academy in St Petersburg.

His work was represented in 2003 at the collective exhibition Dream Factory Communism, the Visual Culture of the Stalin Period...

Article

Russian, 20th century, male.

Born 1875, in Moscow; died 1958, in Moscow.

Painter, graphic artist, designer. Local scenes, landscapes. Stage sets.

Symbolism, Socialist Realism.

Groups: Peredvizhniki (Wanderers), Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia (AKhRR).

Konstantin Fedorovich Yuon studied under Abram Arkhipov, Konstantin Korovin, and Konstantin Savitsky at the Moscow Institute of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture from 1892 to 1898 and in the studio of Valentin A. Serov from 1898 to 1900. He then went travelling to Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and France, and on his return taught in his own studio in Moscow from 1900 to 1917. He taught at the USSR Academy of Art (1934–1935) and the Moscow Art Institute (1952–1955)....