1-5 of 5 results  for:

  • Islamic Art x
Clear all

Article

Gordon Campbell

High-relief glass decoration. The effect is achieved by the difficult method of wheel-engraving in cameo rather than intaglio (Tiefschnitt). The process was first used in Islamic glassware and was then used in 17th- and 18th-century Germany, where its finest exponents were Gottfried Spiller (...

Article

Hookah  

Gordon Campbell

Islamic water-pipe (Pers. nārgīl, huqqa; Arab. shisha) consisting of a bottle, a tobacco burner and a stem. The water bottle may be glass, pottery, porcelain or metal (notably Bidri ware). From the 16th century onwards, European glassmakers designed water-pipe bowls for export to the Ottoman Empire....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Ornamental glass shade for an oil lamp, designed to be hung in a mosque. It is usually shaped like a vase, with a bulbous body, a flared neck, a flat base, and applied glass loops from which it was suspended. The form emerged in late 13th-century Syria, and many of the finest examples come from Syria and Egypt. From the 16th century mosque lamps were made in Europe (notably Venice) and exported to the Islamic world....

Article

Gordon Campbell

German glass manufactory. In 1866 the German glassmaker Fritz Eckert (c. 1840–c. 1905) founded a factory in Petersdorf, Silesia (now Pieszków, Poland). At first the factory specialized in historical styles ranging from Islamic designs to enamelled 17th- and 18th-century German Humpen. In ...

Article

Margaret Graves

Architectural opening to admit light and air that may be covered with a screen, grille, glass or shutters, or left without covering depending on the surrounding environment and climate. Windows in Islamic architecture frequently, although certainly not always, take the form of an Arches in Islamic architecture...