1-20 of 22 results  for:

  • South/Southeast Asian Art x
  • 1300–1400 x
Clear all

Article

See Mamluk family

Article

R. Nath

Dynasty that ruled portions of southern India from 1347 to 1527. ‛Ala al-Din Hasan Bahman (reg 1347–58) threw off the administrative control that the Tughluq dynasty had exerted in the Deccan and established the Bahmani kingdom with its capital at Gulbarga. Hasan Bahman was followed by ...

Article

See Mamluk family

Article

See Mamluk family

Article

See Mamluk family

Article

See Mamluk family

Article

Bazaar  

Mohammad Gharipour

Bazaar, which is rooted in Middle Persian wāzār and Armenian vačaṟ, has acquired three different meanings: the market as a whole, a market day, and the marketplace. The bazaar as a place is an assemblage of workshops and stores where various goods and services are offered....

Article

Besakih  

D. J. Stuart-Fox

Balinese Hindu temple (pura) complex. It is situated on the south-western flank of the volcano Gunung Agung, Bali’s highest mountain, in the north-east of the island. Associated probably since prehistoric times with the Lord of the Mountain, now identified with the Hindu god Shiva, it has been a dynastic temple of several royal families since at least the 15th century. The complex consists of 22 temples, spread along three parallel ridges over a distance of more than a kilometre. The complex was not planned as an entity but seems to have been constructed piecemeal, and the overall structure that links the temples is more ritual and symbolic than physical. The annual cycle of more than 70 rituals culminates in the enormous centennial Ekadasa Rudra ceremony....

Article

Heather Elgood

Two groups of Hindu temples of the 10th–15th centuries ad on the edge of a small lake near Udaipur in Rajasthan, India. The complex is enclosed by undecorated walls similar to those at Baroli. The main temple at Eklingji is dedicated to Shiva and houses a ...

Article

See Mamluk family

Article

See Mamluk family

Article

Hoysala  

J. Marr

Dynasty that ruled the southern Deccan, India, from the early 12th century to the mid-14th. The name refers to a story of the dynastic founder Sala (reg mid-11th century) killing a tiger (hoy) that was menacing a Jaina ascetic. Dates for the earlier rulers are uncertain. Bittiga (also known as Bittideva or Vishnuvardhana) for example reigned, according to various sources, ...

Article

J. Marr

Dynasty that ruled portions of the eastern Deccan, India, from the 11th century to the 14th. Originally feudatories of the Chalukyas of Kalyana (see Chalukya, §2), the Kakatiyas emerged as a power of note under Parola I, a tributary of Someshvara I (...

Article

Khalji  

R. Nath

Dynasty of Afghan Turks who ruled northern India from 1290 to 1320. Jalal al-Din Khalji seized the throne in 1290 from Shams al-Din Kaimuth, the last Mamluk ruler of Balban’s line. The third Khalji ruler, ‛Ala al-Din (reg 1296–1316), extended sultanate authority into the Deccan and captured important forts in Rajasthan. ...

Article

R. Nath and Robert Irwin

Name applied to two distinct sequences of Islamic rulers in northern India and the Levant from the 13th century. Many but not all of the rulers were manumitted slaves of Turkish origin, hence the common names of the lines.

R. Nath

This quasi-dynastic line of Turks conquered and ruled northern India from ...

Article

Michael Curschmann

The medieval term mappa mundi (also forma mundi, historia/istoire) covers a broad array of maps of the world of which roughly 1100 survive. These have resisted systematic classification, but the clearly dominant type is one that aims at comprehensively symbolistic representation. Its early, schematic form is a disc composed of three continents surrounded and separated from one another by water (“T-O Map”) and associated with the three sons of Noah: Asia (Shem) occupies all of the upper half, Europe (Japhet) to the left and Africa (Ham) to the right share the lower half. Quadripartite cartographic schemes included the antipodes as a fourth continent, but the tripartite model was adopted by the large majority of the more developed world maps in use from the 11th century on and—with important variations—well into the Renaissance. While details were added as available space permitted, the Mediterranean continued to serve as the vertical axis and, with diminishing clarity, the rivers Don and Nile as the horizontal one. The map also continues to be ‘oriented’ towards Asia, where paradise sits at the very top. A circular ocean forms the perimeter and not infrequently the city of Jerusalem constitutes its centre....

Article

Pandya  

Michael D. Rabe

Dynasty that ruled portions of southern India from about the 4th century bc to the 14th century ad. With a continuous history of at least 18 centuries, the Pandyas were possibly India’s most enduring dynasty. Early references to them include that of a Greek emissary to the ...

Article

See Mamluk family

Article

See Mamluk family

Article

See Mamluk family