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Jim Barr and Mary Barr

New Zealand painter. After graduating in sculpture from the University of Canterbury in 1961, he began to paint seriously. He was involved professionally in archaeology, including recording early Maori rock drawings. In 1963 he travelled to Europe, returning to Christchurch in 1967. He extended his use of photographic sources for his work from the Old Masters to medical and often grotesque images, as in ...

Article

Darrell Lewis

Site of Aboriginal culture at Delamere Station, c. 380 km south of Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. It consists of several galleries of paintings and engravings in rock shelters around and near the base of a monolithic sandstone outcrop. Painted motifs include birds, echidnas, kangaroos, a dingo, a Rainbow snake, lizards, a turtle, human figures, hafted stone axes and a European with firearms and cattle. Most of the paintings are silhouettes, either monochrome or outlined with a contrasting colour. Some have additional elaboration, such as internal dividing lines or simple X-ray features. The paintings are probably less than 1000 years old, since the Delamere sandstone is relatively soft. The engravings are abraded, most being randomly orientated, parallel grooves, with some bird and animal tracks and circular pits. These abraded motifs are also unlikely to be very old....

Article

Darrell Lewis

Site of Aboriginal culture, c. 100 km north-east of Broken Hill, in the arid country of western New South Wales, south-east Australia. It is known for its complex of pecked rock engravings; these are concentrated on an area of sloping sandstone pavements (c. 100×30 m), although others are more dispersed. Some are found along an ephemeral creek that leads to the base of the sandstone outcrop where there are several rock holes that provided the Aborigines with a permanent water-supply. The rock holes were discovered by Europeans in the mid-19th century and were visited by several exploring expeditions in the 1860s. Although the engravings are within sight of the water-holes, which were of great importance to European settlers and travellers in the region, they were not documented until the 1920s. The area containing the engravings and other Aboriginal relics was declared a reserve in ...

Article

Andrée Rosenfeld

Complex of Aboriginal sites on the north-west coast of Tasmania, Australia. It has the best-known and largest collection of Aboriginal petroglyphs in Tasmania, with six individual sites where engravings (as they are also known) have been carved on rocky outcrops at, or just above, the high-water level and close to a freshwater creek. Since the petroglyphs are exposed to windblown beach sands, salt spray and the surf of very high tides and are associated with shell-midden deposits characteristic of the more recent prehistory of Tasmania (i.e. not earlier than ...

Article

Andrée Rosenfeld

Site of Aboriginal activity, c. 50 km north-west of Cobar, western New South Wales, south-east Australia. The Cobar Plain is a broad, semi-arid plain south of the Darling River. Intermittent rains have eroded the sandstone to produce short, narrow valleys with low cliffs and rock shelters. Permanent water-holes in the vicinity were important centres for Aboriginal activity with concentrations of campsites and painted rock shelters. Eight of the shelters clustered around Mt Grenfell have paintings; two of the largest also have evidence of habitation....

Article

Darrell Lewis

Aboriginal site in the Laura region of Cape York Peninsula, northern Queensland, Australia. The name refers to a group of seven rock shelters located near the head of a small gorge on an elevated sandstone plateau. These contain paintings and engravings that are typical of so-called Laura ...

Article

Andrée Rosenfeld

Aboriginal site in the Cleland Hills, c. 300 km west of Alice Springs, Northern Territory, central Australia. It is one of the larger and more permanent water-holes in the area, set in a gorge cut through the sandstone, and has been a significant resource for Aboriginal people. Shelters near by contain evidence of camping and many also have rock paintings, but most attention has been drawn to the petroglyphs on the cliff faces in the gorge (Edwards). They are patinated and some are worn and partly frittered away, suggesting that they are of some antiquity. The most striking motifs are face-like designs deeply pecked out in the fairly soft sandstone. The face motifs vary in detail, but all are characterized by two large circles or sets of concentric circles with a central pit, which constitute the eyes. The narrow ridge between the eyes is sometimes lengthened downwards by a groove creating the impression of a nose. Some have a heart-shaped outline with pointed ‘chin’; on others the ‘chin’ is rounded and contains a parallel arc suggesting a smiling mouth. Some of the faces are devoid of contour lines and are merely composed of two concentric circles that create a wide-eyed impression and two short arcs suggesting a mouth and chin. These motifs comprise only about 4% of the total petroglyph complement. Most of the motifs employed are bird and some animal tracks, circles, arcs, pits and amorphous designs; this range of motifs has been defined by Maynard as the Panaramittee style (...

Article

Andrée Rosenfeld

Aboriginal site c. 500 km north-west of Brisbane, on Mt Moffat station in the Carnarvon Range of Queensland, central Australia. It is the site of a rock shelter in the form of a wide amphitheatre with a recessed rock surface at its base, on which is found an extensive collection of stencilled rock paintings. A shallow cave at one end of the overhang also contains some hand-stencilled designs. Unlike many rock shelters in the Central Highlands of Queensland, there is no evidence at The Tombs that the shelter was ever used for burials; instead the paintings are apparently associated with habitation debris. Excavations by ...

Article

Ubirr  

Darrell Lewis

Complex of at least 36 Aboriginal sites in the Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia, formerly known by the anglicized form of its name. The entire area near the East Alligator River Crossing in Western Arnhem Land is subject to seasonal monsoonal flooding, but there are numerous sandstone outcrops and monoliths containing rock shelters above the maximum flood level. The rock paintings found in these shelters include representative examples from the earliest styles to the most recent (...