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French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 26 June 1844, in Brienne-le-Château; died 23 January 1931, in Périgueux.

Painter. Figures, portraits, genre scenes, landscapes, seascapes. Wall decorations.

Realism.

Jules-Charles Aviat was the son of a bolting (flour-sifting) machine operator, Jean Baptiste Mauperrin, and Marie Marguerite Doux. After the death of her husband, Marie married Pierre Antoine Aviat by whom she had two more children. In ...

Article

Austrian, 20th century, male.

Born 1930, in Vienna.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, illustrator, sculptor, collage artist, decorative designer. Scenes with figures, figures. Stage sets.

Groups: Hundsgruppe (Dog’s group), Phantastischer Realismus group.

Ernst Fuchs enrolled at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna in 1945. From 1946 to 1950, he was a pupil of Gütersloh, whom Salvador Dalí considered the most important painter of his time (after himself). In around 1950, he was one of the founders of the Viennese ...

Article

German, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 9 February 1932, in Dresden.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman, photographer. Murals.

Conceptual Art, Citationism, Appropriation Art.

Capitalist Realism Group.

Gerhard Richter trained as a painter-decorator and publicity artist in Zittau in 1948 before going on to study from 1951 to 1956 at the fine arts academy in Dresden, where he took classes in painting and, in particular, fresco work. Although Germany was still partitioned at the time, he managed to flee East Germany in 1961. He settled in Düsseldorf and enrolled at the city’s fine arts academy, where he studied under K.O. Götz. His circle of friends included Sigmar Pole, Konrad Lueg (who would go on to operate the Konrad Fischer gallery) and Blinky Palermo. Richter travelled to New York in the company of the latter in 1970. Since 1971, Gerhard Richter has taught at the fine arts academy in Düsseldorf, living and working in nearby Cologne since 1983. He was awarded the Arnold Bode Prize in Kassel in 1981 and the Oskar Kokoschka Prize in Vienna in 1985....

Article

Rococo  

Richard John and Ludwig Tavernier

A decorative style of the early to mid-18th century, primarily influencing the ornamental arts in Europe, especially in France, southern Germany and Austria. The character of its formal idiom is marked by asymmetry and naturalism, displaying in particular a fascination with shell-like and watery forms. Further information on the Rococo can be found in this dictionary within the survey articles on the relevant countries....