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Alexandra Wedgwood

In 

See Pugin family

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See Pugin family

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Andrzej Rottermund

Polish architect and writer, also active in Italy. He probably studied in Rome in the late 1770s and returned to Italy in 1785–6 under the aegis of Stanisław Kostka Potocki, a collector and amateur architect with whom he collaborated throughout his life. In 1786 Aigner and Potocki refronted the church of St Anna, Warsaw, using a giant composite order on high pedestals. The political turmoil of the 1790s disrupted Aigner’s career, but during his second phase of creativity (...

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Pavel Zatloukal

Bohemian architect, active in Moravia. He studied at the Royal Professional Polytechnical Institute in Prague under Georg Fischer (1768–1828), in whose office he subsequently worked. During the 1820s he worked on two Bohemian estates of the Chotek family, becoming involved in the final stages of building their country house at Kačina (...

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Volker Helas

German architect, teacher and writer. He attended the Gewerbeschule in Chemnitz and studied architecture (1841–50) at the Dresden Kunstakademie under Gustav Heine (1802–80) and Gottfried Semper. In 1849 he was awarded a travel scholarship and visited southern Germany, Italy, France and Belgium. From ...

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Hugh Maguire

Irish architect . He received his early education at the Collège de St Servais, Liège. While at St Mary’s College, Oscott (1851–5), with which A. W. N. Pugin was strongly associated, he studied drawing and perspective and developed an interest in architecture. Between 1856...

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Mario Bencivenni

Italian architect . He studied under Giuseppe Cacialli at the school of architecture of the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence, which was directed by Gasparo Maria Paoletti, the leader of the Neo-classical architectural movement in Tuscany. In 1812 Baccani was awarded first prize for architecture in the Accademia’s prestigious triennial competition with a design for a prison, a project that already demonstrated the principal characteristic of Baccani’s work, his alternation between a Neo-classical vocabulary and a medieval, Romantic one. Indeed, his earliest executed works in Florence were the Gothic Revival tower (...

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Jean-François Pinchon

French architect and writer . He trained at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, in the studio of Louis-Hippolyte Lebas and won the competition for the Prix de Rome in 1840. On his return to Paris from Rome he embarked on a brilliant administrative career, becoming Architecte en Chef, then Inspecteur Général, of the city of Paris, as well as Inspecteur Général des Edifices Diocésains. In the latter capacity, his work in Paris included completing the church of Ste Clothilde (...

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Kirk Ambrose

Lithuanian art historian, scholar of folklore and Egyptology, and diplomat of Russian birth. Son of the celebrated Lithuanian Symbolist poet of the same name, Jurgis Baltrušaitis II studied under Henri(-Joseph) Focillon at the Sorbonne and earned the PhD in 1931. The concerns of his mentor are evident in ...

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Paul Larmour

Irish architect . He trained first with Thomas Duff of Newry and then for two years with Edward Gribbon of Dublin before setting up on his own in 1850 in Newry, where he was responsible for a number of buildings. His Non-subscribing Presbyterian Church (1853...

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Jean-Michel Leniaud

French architect . His was one of the first generations of French architects to take a serious interest in the art of the Middle Ages, a development led by scholars in Normandy. Like most architects of his time, he was trained by analysing historic monuments, in his case concentrating on making drawings (...

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Ye. A. Beletskaya

Russian architect. From his earliest childhood he lived in Moscow, where his father was a minor cleric in one of the Kremlin churches. He studied painting in Moscow under the important architect Dmitry Ukhtomsky, who accepted him into his school of architecture in 1751 and had him enrolled for classes in fine arts and languages at Moscow University in ...

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Roderick O’Donnell

English architect and designer. At 16 he became a builder’s apprentice in London, where in 1857 he joined the firm of Henry Clutton but later declined a partnership with Clutton. He became a Catholic in 1861 and worked almost exclusively for the Catholic Church, although at first he received only minor commissions. He collaborated with ...

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Jean van Cleven

The son of a carpenter, he was trained under Adam Erkens, Louis Joseph Adrien Roelandt and Pierre Bourla. Before 1825–6 he became a director of works for the city of Antwerp, where he was responsible for the covering over of the unnavigable watercourses in 1826–8...

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Susanne Kronbichler-Skacha

After training at the Polytechnic School in Prague and the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna (1838–41), he became an architect in the General-Bau-Direktion, the central building authority in Vienna. In 1850 he was invited by Paul Eduard Sprenger, with whom he had already collaborated on the east wing of the old city town hall (...

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Belgian architect, designer, mural and glass painter. Born into a prominent family, he was originally destined for a career in politics or administration but became known, in the words of W(illiam) H(enry) J(ames) Weale, as the ‘ Pugin of Belgium’ (Building News, xxxvi, 1879...

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Rosamond Allwood

English furniture designer and manufacturer. He may have been trained by the Gothic Revival architect and furniture designer J. P. Seddon, whose work certainly influenced his first published design, a davenport in a geometric Reformed Gothic style, in the Building News of 1865. That year he also advertised a ‘New Registered Reclining Chair’, made by ...

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Alan Crawford

English architect. He was the son of a Midlands architect, George Bidlake (1830–92). After some experience in his father’s office, he worked as assistant to Robert Edis, Bodley & Garner and Rowand Anderson. He began working in Birmingham c. 1888; most of his work, which consists mainly of churches and houses, was done in and around that city. He designed and built nine churches, all but one of which belong to the late phase of the Gothic Revival: they are late Perpendicular in inspiration and inventive in detail. Each has the nave and chancel united in a single airy space. The finest is St Agatha’s (...

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Valerie A. Clack

Australian architect, of English birth. He was the son of James Blacket, a London cloth merchant, and he initially worked in his father’s office and in a linen mill in Yorkshire before becoming a surveyor for the Stockton and Darlington Railway, where he must have obtained a knowledge of building. Blacket also sketched and measured old buildings in his spare time. In ...

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John Martin Robinson

English architect. He was the eldest son of Thomas Blore, an antiquarian and lawyer of Stamford. He began as a topographical artist preparing illustrations for his father’s History of Rutland (1811) and several other early 19th-century county histories. By this means he came to the notice of Sir ...