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Article

Philip Ward-Jackson

English sculptor, silversmith and illustrator. He was the son of a chaser and attended the Royal Academy Schools, London. At first he gave his attention equally to silverwork and to sculpture, exhibiting at the Royal Academy from 1851. An early bronze, St Michael and the Serpent...

Article

Michèle Lavallée

Decorative style of the late 19th century and the early 20th that flourished principally in Europe and the USA. Although it influenced painting and sculpture, its chief manifestations were in architecture and the decorative and graphic arts, the aspects on which this survey concentrates. It is characterized by sinuous, asymmetrical lines based on organic forms; in a broader sense it encompasses the geometrical and more abstract patterns and rhythms that were evolved as part of the general reaction to 19th-century historicism. There are wide variations in the style according to where it appeared and the materials that were employed....

Article

Alan Crawford

Informal movement in architecture and the decorative arts that championed the unity of the arts, the experience of the individual craftsman, and the qualities of materials and construction in the work itself.

The Arts and Crafts Movement developed in the second half of the 19th century and lasted well into the 20th, drawing its support from progressive artists, architects and designers, philanthropists, amateurs, and middle-class women seeking work in the home. They set up small workshops apart from the world of industry, revived old techniques, and revered the humble household objects of pre-industrial times. The movement was strongest in the industrializing countries of northern Europe and in the USA, and it can best be understood as an unfocused reaction against industrialization. Although quixotic in its anti-industrialism, it was not unique; indeed it was only one among several late 19th-century reform movements, such as the Garden City movement, vegetarianism, and folksong revivals, that set the Romantic values of nature and folk culture against the artificiality of modern life....

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 November 1868, in Bordeaux; died 27 June 1947, in Paris.

Sculptor, illustrator. Statues, busts, medals.

Having chosen an artistic career, Léon Blanchot left university to train as a sculptor at the École des Beaux-Arts in Bordeaux, then went to Paris and settled there. He regularly took part in the Salon des Artistes Français, and became a member of this society. His main works are ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1867, in Annecy; died after 1926.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver, medallist, illustrator, art writer. Portraits, scenes with figures.

André Charles Coppier exhibited in Paris at the Salon des Artistes Français and at the Salon de la Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, of which he was a member. He was awarded silver at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 28 February 1865, in Munich; died 1954.

Painter, illustrator, engraver, medallist. Religious subjects, mythological subjects.

After doing an apprenticeship with an engraver Maximilian Dasio entered the Munich academy in 1884, where he studied under Heterich and W. von Diez. Following the success of his sets for the Deutsches Theater, he obtained a scholarship which enabled him to stay in Rome. On his return to Munich he became a teacher at the Damenakademie from ...

Article

Philip Attwood

German painter, medallist, designer and illustrator. He trained as a painter in the Munich Akademie from 1884, and initially won fame in this art with large decorative schemes on mythological or religious themes (e.g. Bacchanal, c. 1888; Munich, Villa Schülein) and portraits painted in a broad, realistic manner (e.g. ...

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1862, in Birmingham; died 4 June 1928.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman, illustrator, worker in precious metals, designer. Religious subjects, allegorical subjects, portraits. Jewellery.

Arts and Crafts.

Arthur Joseph Gaskin studied at the Birmingham School of Art, where he later taught. He was a member of the Arts and Crafts movement founded by William Morris, whose aim was to revitalise the decorative arts. From 1899, together with his wife Georgina Cave France, he created gold and silver jewellery, sometimes decorated with enamel. In 1902, he replaced R. Catterson Smith as director of the Birmingham School of Jewellery. He exhibited paintings at the Royal Academy in London in 1889 and 1890 and jewellery at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle....

Article

Austrian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 14 November 1859, in Baden, near Vienna; died 9 April 1925, in Vienna.

Painter, sculptor, medallist, illustrator. Religious subjects, figures, landscapes.

Johannes Mayerhofer studied at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna and worked mainly on decorations for churches....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 3 November 1846, in Mattapoisett (Massachusetts); died 15 April 1912, in the sinking of the Titanic.

Painter, medallist, draughtsman, illustrator. History painting, portraits, genre scenes. Murals.

Francis Millet studied in Antwerp under Van Lerins and Keyser, and worked in Europe and the US before covering the Russo-Turkish war and the 1898 war between the US and Spain as a war correspondent. He took part in the Salon des Artistes Français in Paris, won a Silver Medal at the 1889 Universal Exhibition and was a Member of the Jury (representing the US) and hors-concours in 1900. Millet became an Associate of the National Academy in New York in 1882, a Member of the Academy in 1885 and was made a Chevalier of the Légion d'Honneur in 1900....

Article

Italian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 8th January 1857, in Milan; died 1950.

Painter, sculptor, illustrator, medallist.

Pogliaghi sculpted numerous monuments, statues and ornaments for the churches and public buildings of northern Italy.

Milan (Pinacoteca di Brera): The Chapel of St Joseph in the Church of Ste-Marie de la Paix...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 22 November 1875, in Teterov (Mechlemburg).

Painter, lithographer, engraver, decorative designer. Ex-libris plates, designs (precious metals).

Rudolf Rochga was a pupil of Franz von Stuck at the Munich Academy. He gave goldsmith's designs to the firm of Peter Bruckmann & Son at Heilbronn. In ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in the USA.

Born 25 June 1871, in Le Havre.

Painter, sculptor, medallist, illustrator.

Theodore Spicer-Simson lived and worked in New York and studied in England, Germany and at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, becoming a member of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts in ...

Article

Danish, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 30 November 1853, in Copenhagen; died 2 April 1932, in Fredensborg.

Painter, draughtsman, illustrator, caricaturist, miniaturist, designer. Wall decorations, postage stamps, ex-libris plates, medals.

Tegner was the son of the lithographer and portraitist Isaac Wilhelm Tegner, and the nephew of Christian Martin. He trained under Jørgen Roed at the Kunstakademi in Copenhagen. He was director of the technical college of the museum of Copenhagen, and of a porcelain factory....