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Alexandra Wedgwood

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See Pugin family

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See Pugin family

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Claude Laroche

French architect and restorer. He was the son of a Neo-classical architect of the same name (1783–1868), who was a pupil of Charles Percier and architect to the département of Charente. The younger Paul Abadie began studying architecture in 1832 by joining the atelier of ...

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Swiss, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 22 December 1769, in Schlinig; died 10 September 1863, in Kerns (Nidwalden).

Sculptor. Animals, groups. Statues.

He initially trained under the sculptor Mathias Punt in Schlinig (Slingia, South Tyrol), then went to work in Strasbourg. After moving on to Switzerland, Franz Abart settled in Lucerne and established a reputation as an accomplished artist. His crucifixes, which are found in several Swiss churches, confirm his talent. At Kerns, he met and married the daughter of an important official: a fortunate circumstance that contributed to his success. Exhibitions in Bern in ...

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British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1763, in Exeter; died 1851.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver, draughtsman, illustrator. Landscapes with figures, natural history (animals/insects).

John White Abbott took up painting initially as a hobby but became well known for his landscapes with animals and human figures. He was particularly influenced by the lesser Dutch masters, notably Peter de Laes. His work sufficiently impressed contemporaries such as Sir Joshua Reynolds and Benjamin West that they urged him to exhibit at the Royal Academy, and he submitted work to the Academy between ...

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Susan Morris

English watercolourist, painter and apothecary. He was nephew of the prominent lawyer John White (1744–1825). An important patron of Francis Towne, he spent his entire career in Exeter as an apothecary and surgeon. Abbot was a keen amateur artist, taking lessons from Towne, but although he was an Honorary Exhibitor of landscape oils at the Royal Academy, London, from ...

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Çigdem Kafesçioglu and Walter B. Denny

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See Ottoman family

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Isabelle Denis

French painter. He was the natural son of Alexandre de Pujol de Mortry, a nobleman and provost of Valenciennes, but did not use his father’s name until after 1814. He trained first at the Académie de Valenciennes (1799–1803), then at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, and in the studio of ...

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Andrzej Ryszkiewicz

Austrian painter. He studied at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna under Jakob Matthias Schmutzer (1733–1811) from 1783. On the advice of his mentor, Heinrich Füger, Abel turned from landscape to history painting, winning a gold medal in 1794 for Daedalus and Icarus...

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German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 22 August 1764, in Aschach; died 1818, in Vienna.

Painter, engraver. Mythological subjects, portraits.

Joseph Abel's remarkable abilities became evident at a very early age. Taken on by Füger, he made such rapid progress that he was soon painting. He caught the attention of the head of the Czartoryski family, who took the young artist to Poland. There he did various works before moving to Rome, arriving in ...

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Swedish, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active still active in 1809.

Born c. 1760, in Sweden.

Sculptor. Statues, busts.

Frédérik Ulrik Aberg was the son of a modeller working at the royal palace in Stockholm. He studied with Johan Tobias Sergel, and also at the Stockholm royal academy of fine arts. His busts and medallions are considered to be more accomplished than his statues....

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Danish, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1743, in Copenhagen; died 1809, in Copenhagen.

Painter. History painting, allegorical subjects, mythological subjects, figures.

Nikolai Abildgaard was first taught by his father, the distinguished draughtsman Søren Abildgaard. He was then sent to the Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi in Copenhagen, where he won the 'great gold medal' (awarded two years after the gold medal). Shortly afterwards he went to Italy, where he spent six years, visiting the major art centres and studying the old masters. He stayed mainly in Rome, where he made copies of Raphael, Michelangelo and Titian, and met Jens Juel, Tobias Sergel, and Henry (Johann Heinrich) Fuseli....

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Jens Peter Munk

Danish painter, designer and architect. His paintings reveal both Neo-classical and Romantic interests and include history paintings as well as literary and mythological works. The variety of his subject-matter reflects his wide learning, a feature further evidenced by the broad range of his creative output. In addition to painting, he produced decorative work, sculpture and furniture designs, as well as being engaged as an architect. Successfully combining both intellectual and imaginative powers, he came to be fully appreciated only in the 1980s....

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German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active at the end of the 18th and at the beginning of the 19th century.

Born probably in Kempten.

Painter.

He was still working in Ulm in 1812.

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John Ford

English publisher and patron of German birth. He trained as a carriage designer in Paris and moved to England between 1783 and 1786. He established his own business as a carriage maker, undertaking major commissions in London and Dublin. In 1804 he designed Pius VII’s carriage for the coronation of Napoleon and in ...

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Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1745, in Forlì; died 1823, in Bologna.

Sculptor.

In his day, Luigi Aquisti was a much-respected artist who worked above all in Rome, Milan and Bologna (reference is made to him as being there as of 1788). While still in Rome, he was responsible for decorating the altar of the S Giuseppe Colasonzio Chapel in the church of S Pantaleone. He also produced reliefs representing scenes from Homer and from Roman history for the staircase of the Braschi Palace. In Bologna, his work includes the decoration of the S Giobbe Oratory and four major statues for the cupola of S Maria della Vita. In ...

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active at the end of the 18th and at the beginning of the 19th century.

Miniaturist.

E. Acres worked in London in 1800, in which year he exhibited 30 miniatures at the Royal Academy.

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active at the end of the 18th and at the beginning of the 19th century.

Painter, engraver. Architectural views.

S. Acton lived in London between 1791 and 1802 and exhibited at the Royal Academy.

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1737, in Valenciennes; died 1820, in Valenciennes.

Sculptor.

Grégoire Adam is not mentioned in artists' records, but Gombert, the architect from Lille who built the Hôtel Merghelynck at Ypres, thought him fit to compete with the best artists of French Flanders in the ornamentation of this supreme expression of 18th-century art. He decorated one of the salons, installing in it medallions of ...

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Swiss, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1766, in Geneva; died 1820, in St Petersburg.

Enameller, miniaturist. Figures.

He worked in Geneva, subsequently in Russia. A miniature by him (a portrait of a man) was sold by René Ch. in 1919 for 520 francs.

Geneva: Adrienne Lecouvreur...