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Article

Gordon Campbell

American family of joiners and cabinetmakers, active in Hadfield, MA. The brothers John Allis (1642–91) and Samuel Allis (1647–91), whose maternal great-uncle was Nicholas Disbrowe, were both joiners, as was John’s son Ichabod (1675–1747). The firm was managed by John Allis the elder, and employed his brother and sons; John the elder’s partner was ...

Article

Raymonde Gauthier

French architect and builder, active in Canada . He arrived in Quebec in 1675 and was contracted as a mason to the seminary of Quebec for three years. He probably assumed responsibility from 1675 for all buildings constructed on lands granted to the seminary, both within the town of Quebec and on the country estates owned by this association of French lay preachers. It is only from ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

American joiner. He was brought to America by his parents c. 1640. In 1661 he moved to Hadley (now Massachusetts) in the Connecticut River valley, and entered into partnership with John Allis family. Belden’s son Samuel (1665–1738) and Allis’s son Ichabod (1675–1747...

Article

Gordon Campbell

In furniture legs, a baluster or vase shape is surmounted by an inverted cup (the ‘bell’). This type of turning is common in English furniture, especially in the 17th century, and also appears on American furniture c. 1690–1720.

Article

Gordon Campbell

American goldsmith and silversmith of Dutch origin, based in New York. His most characteristic products are spoons, teapots, beakers and tankards (with coins set in the lids); his pieces are marked with the letters IB in a shield. The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has a fine silver teapot and a silver seal made for civic use in Marbletown (Ulster County, NY). Jacob’s son Henricus was also a silversmith....

Article

Gerald W. R. Ward

American silversmith, goldsmith and engraver. The son of a cooper, Coney probably served his apprenticeship with Jeremiah Dummer (1645–1718) of Boston. Coney may have engraved the plates for the first banknotes printed in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1690 and certainly engraved the plates for those issued in ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

American oak chest made in the Connecticut River valley in the late 17th century. The panels and drawer fronts carved with what have traditionally been called ‘tulip and sunflower’ motifs; they would be more accurately described as ‘tulip and marigold’. The chests were sometimes decorated with split banisters applied to the verticals. The Connecticut chest has traditionally thought to have been developed by ...

Article

American, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born 1655, in Boston; died 1722, in Boston.

Engraver.

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American pottery in Burlington, NJ. It was founded in 1688 by Dr Daniel Coxe (b ?Stoke Newington, England, 1640/41; d ?London, 19 Jan 1730) and John DeWilde (b c.1665; d Doctor’s Creek, NJ, 1708). A Cambridge-trained physician, Dr Coxe had extensive interests in the American colonies and was Governor of East and West Jersey from ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

American furniture-maker. In the late 1660s Dennis moved from Portsmouth to Ipswich, where he entered into a partnership with William Searle (whose widow he was later to marry). Furniture by Dennis and Searle is represented in the collections of the Winterthur Museum in Delaware and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston....

Article

Gordon Campbell

American cabinetmaker. He emigrated from England to Hartford, CT in the mid-1630s. Some Connecticut chests have been attributed to his workshop, but he is no longer believed to have been the originator of the form. The signature of Disbrowe on the Hadley chest in the Bayou Bend collection in Houston is now considered to be fraudulent....

Article

Gordon Campbell

American silversmith, apparently the first to be born in America. He was apprenticed in the Boston workshop of John Hull (see under Boston, §III, 2, (i)). Dummer's silverwork is severe, but includes stylish objects, such as cups with cast scroll and caryatid handles. His apprentices probably included ...

Article

American, 17th century, male.

Born 1648, in Dorchester (Massachusetts); died 9 September 1681, in Boston.

Engraver (wood).

John Foster was a student at Harvard College and in 1675 founded Boston's first printing works. Two engravings that he printed himself are attributed to him; a portrait of the churchman ...

Article

David Tatham

American printer and printmaker. He was the son of early settlers in Massachusetts and graduated from Harvard College in 1667; he then taught in Dorchester (now South Boston) and about 1670 began making the earliest pictorial woodcuts in English-speaking North America. In 1675 he became the first letterpress printer in Boston and the second in New England. Foster’s woodcut ...

Article

Thierry Bajou

French painter. He trained in the studio of Simon Vouet after 1627 and in 1634 travelled to Rome, where he was influenced by the work of Raphael and Guido Reni and by such artists as Girolamo Muziano. In 1635 he painted a copy (Longeau, parish church) of ...

Article

Kevin D. Murphy

Domestic architecture in the USA comprises a wide variety of types—including detached single-family residences, row houses or town houses, apartment buildings, and more—as well as structures ranging from impermanent earth-fast dwellings of the seventeenth century to contemporary ‘McMansions’ measuring thousands of square feet in size. What makes housing important are the many ways in which it has deeply touched the lives of all Americans. Because of its diversity, the domestic architecture of the USA has been studied from a range of disciplinary perspectives, from the formal to the anthropological....

Article

Oscar P. Fitzgerald

Technique for imitating Asian Lacquer. Once Dutch and Portuguese traders imported lacquer ware from the Far East after 1700, Europeans became fascinated by this technique. Originating in ancient China, it spread to Japan where it is still practiced in the 21st century. The process involved the application of up to a hundred coats of lacquer produced from the sap of the ...

Article

Kas  

Gordon Campbell

Large American cupboard of Dutch origin manufactured in the Hudson and Delaware areas from the late 17th century to the early 19th. It was a large piece of furniture, sometimes decorated with grisaille panels, and was used for the storage of clothes and (in some cases) dishes....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Type of upholstered settee or sofa with a high back and arms hinged from the seat level; the arms could be vertical (with the tops level with the back) or sloped outwards. The prototype is a ‘couch chair’ (i.e. a settee or sofa) made in the early 17th century (possibly 1630s). This settee, which has been in Knole (Kent, NT) for centuries, is upholstered in red velvet and has red fringes. It may be identical with the ‘couch’ made in ...

Article

Canadian family of artists, of French origin. Jean Levasseur (1622–86) and his brother Pierre Levasseur (1629–c. 1681) trained in France as master joiners, before settling in Quebec. From the mid-17th century they and their numerous descendants executed ornamental interiors for civil and ecclesiastical buildings, greatly contributing to the richness of French-influenced architectural decoration in churches throughout Quebec. Records in public archives show contracts and receipts for major new projects, repairs, restoration, statues, crucifixes, candlesticks, coats of arms and boat-carving undertaken by family members, many of whom remain unidentified. The most notable member of the family was the architectural sculptor ...