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Italian architect and theorist. He was the son of Antonio Bertotti, a local barber, and Vittoria Scabora; through the patronage of Marchese Mario Capra, an amateur poet and architect, he was able to study architecture in the private school opened in Vicenza in 1748 by Domenico Cerato, and he became curator of the Accademia Olimpica in ...

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T. P. Connor

Scottish architect and writer. He was the key propagandist for the Palladian revival in early 18th-century England (see Palladianism). First as an architectural publisher and then as an architect, he did as much as any contemporary to determine the lines of development of secular architecture for a generation....

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Roger White

Scottish architect.

Gibbs was the younger son of an Aberdeen merchant, Patrick Gibb(s), and was brought up a Roman Catholic. He was educated at the Grammar School and at Marischal College in Aberdeen. Shortly before 1700 he left Scotland for the Netherlands, where he stayed with relatives before making his way through France to Italy, visiting Milan, Venice, Bologna, Florence, Genoa and Naples. He arrived in Rome in the autumn of ...

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Peter Leach

English architect. He was probably the son of John Pain, a carpenter at Andover. In the preface to the first volume (1767) of his Plans…of Noblemen and Gentlemen’s Houses he stated that he ‘began the study of architecture in the early part of his life, under the tuition of a man of genius…the late Mr. ...

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Italian architect, civil engineer and art historian. As an architect he is best known for the small neo-Palladian church of S Maria Maddalena (La Maddalena; see below) in Venice; as an art historian he is acclaimed for his Vite dei più celebri architetti e scultori veneziani che fiorirono nel secolo decimosesto...

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Donata Battilotti

Italian theorist, architect, cartographer and painter. He was trained by his father Giulio, city architect of Padua, and at the school of Vincenzo Dotto (1572–1629), a Paduan cosmographer and architect in the Palladian tradition. Despite his vast and genuine erudition, Viola Zanini never held an important post and was beset with financial difficulties throughout his life. He worked as an architect and, by necessity, as a painter of architectural perspectives; none of his work has survived, however, apart from the Palazzo Cumano in Padua (...