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Carlos Cid Priego

Spanish sculptor and ceramicist. He moved to Madrid at an early age and was apprenticed to the French sculptor Robert Michel (i), who was employed at the court. He won first prize in a competition at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes, and organized the royal workshop for the carving of precious stones, where he executed two magnificent cameo portraits of ...

Article

Ingrid Sattel Bernardini

German sculptor, painter and architect. He was the son of a court gardener who worked first in Gotha and then in Württemberg. He was originally intended to become an architect; in 1747 Duke Charles-Eugene of Württemberg sent him to train in Paris where, under the influence of painters such as Charles-Joseph Natoire and François Boucher, he turned to painting. The eight-year period of study in Rome that followed prompted Beyer to devote himself to sculpture, as he was impressed by antique works of sculpture and was also influenced by his close contacts with Johann Joachim Winckelmann and his circle. He also served an apprenticeship with ...

Article

Alison Kelly

English manufacturer of ceramic Artificial stone. From 1769 ‘Mrs’ Coade (adopting a courtesy title extended to unmarried women in business; she is not to be confused with her mother, also Mrs Eleanor Coade) manufactured a ceramic artificial stone at Lambeth in London. It so closely resembled a natural stone that ever since it has been mistaken for it; as a result the extent of her influential business has been greatly underestimated. It survives at more than 650 sites, and hundreds more examples of its use have been recorded. The ...

Article

Term used to describe the continuation in the decorative arts of the Neo-classical style (see Neo-classicism) in France between 1800 and 1805 under Napoleon Bonaparte (First Consul; 1799–1804). His Consulate was an era of renewal in the furniture, porcelain and metalwork industries in France (...

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John Wilton-Ely

Type of delicate, painted Neo-classical decoration, derived mainly from the shapes, motifs and colours of antique vases. It was part of the quest in Europe in the last quarter of the 18th century for a contemporary expression in interior design and the applied arts. The term is applied loosely to various schemes of decoration inspired by Classical sources, involving Renaissance ...

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Term used for a manifestation of the Neo-classical style initiated in the decorative arts of France during the Second Empire (1852–71) of Napoleon III and his wife, the Empress Eugénie. Based on the standard repertory of Greco-Roman ornament, it combined elements from the Adam, Louis XVI and Egyptian styles with a range of motifs inspired by discoveries at Pompeii, where excavations had begun in ...

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Gaye Blake Roberts and Robin Reilly

English firm of ceramic manufacturers. It was founded in 1759 by Josiah Wedgwood (i) (bapt Burslem, Staffs, 12 July 1730; d Burslem, 3 Jan 1795; see §1 below) and was to become one of the most successful and influential English ceramic factories. Although during the early 19th century the factory’s fortunes declined, during the 1840s it regained its former prestige. In the late 20th century the factory was best known for its extensive production of table and ornamental wares....