1-20 of 775 results  for:

  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
  • Ceramics and Pottery x
Clear all

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Active still alive in 1782.

Born 1714, in Zerbst.

Miniaturist.

Brother of E. H. Abel and Ernst August Abel. After working for a time at the royal porcelain manufactory in Berlin, he gave up painting in favour of music, becoming first violinist in Schwerin. His sons Wilhelm, Christian August, and August, were his pupils....

Article

Gordon Campbell

German pottery factory in Thuringia founded c. 1739. In the second half of the 18th century the factory produced beer tankards, floral table decorations, tureens and vases, some decorated with the arms of the Schwarzburg family. The factory mark is a fork.

Article

Gordon Campbell

Name of at least four potters in Staffordshire in the late 18th century and early 19th. The most distinguished William Adams (1746–1805) was the founder of Greengates Pottery, where the design and high quality of his jasper ware has led to the mistaken inference that he had been trained by Josiah Wedgwood; in fact he trained with John Brindley, brother of the canal builder James Brindley. His wares, of which some 300 examples are known to survive, are stamped Adams and Co. Apart from jasper ware, he also made underglaze blue-printed ware. He was succeeded by his son Benjamin, who ran the business until its closure in ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Term for a type of porcelain singerie manufactured in Meissen from the mid-18th century and thereafter imitated at other potteries. The sets typically consisted of some twenty simian musicians and a conductor (e.g. set at Clandon Park, Surrey, NT).

Article

Agano  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese region in Buzen Province (now part of Fukuoka Prefect.), northern Kyushu, where stonewares were manufactured at various sites from c. 1600 (see also Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)).

The first potter to make Agano ware was the Korean master Chon’gye (Jap. Sonkai; ...

Article

Carlos Cid Priego

Spanish sculptor and ceramicist. He moved to Madrid at an early age and was apprenticed to the French sculptor Robert Michel (i), who was employed at the court. He won first prize in a competition at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes, and organized the royal workshop for the carving of precious stones, where he executed two magnificent cameo portraits of ...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Painter (porcelain/enamel).

Article

Luciana Arbace

Italian centre of ceramic production. The town, situated near Savona in Liguria, was a flourishing centre of maiolica production during the Renaissance. It was, however, only during the 17th and 18th centuries that a distinctive style developed. Important families in the pottery business included the ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Spanish pottery manufactory. In 1727 a pottery factory was established in Alcora, in the Catalan province of Castellón (see also Valencia, §3). The most important products of the factory in its early years were plaques and glazed floor titles; the plaques were typically decorated with biblical or mythological scenes set within moulded frames, and the floor tiles used religious motifs (for churches and convents) and secular subjects such as maps and theatrical scenes. Later in the century the factory began to produce tableware, notably fruit bowls, sugar bowls, and pyramidical centrepieces. At the end of the 18th century Italian models were displaced by French design, and the factory began to produce tableware of soft porcelain in the Sèvres style. In this period the factory also started to manufacture the polychrome earthenware terrines known as ...

Article

Bernadette Nelson

Portuguese potter and painter. He became director and painting master of the Real Fábrica do Rato in Lisbon after the expulsion in 1771 of the first director Tomás Brunetto. With his predecessor, Almeida is associated with the factory’s most successful and distinctive period. Initially he collaborated with the potter and painter ...

Article

José Meco

Portuguese decorative artist. His apprenticeship was probably undertaken with Master PMP, the painter of glazed tiles. His most important commission between 1729 and 1731 was for the panels of blue and white tiles, made in Lisbon, that cover the lower storey of the cloister of Oporto Cathedral, which represent scenes from the Song of Solomon. These panels are characteristic of the High Baroque phase of tile-making and show an appreciation of theatre and stage design in the deepening landscape backgrounds of the figurative panels, in the bold outlines and in the enlarged ornamental framing. The spectacular arched frames of the Oporto panels were influenced by Roman Baroque architectural ornament....

Article

Gordon Campbell

German porcelain manufactory in the Bavarian town of Amberg that was founded in 1759 and produced household wares and occasional display pieces until it closed in 1910.

Article

Gordon Campbell

Dutch porcelain factory near Amsterdam, originally founded at Weesp (1764; see Weesp Porcelain Factory), then moved to Oude Loosdrecht (1771), Oude Amstel (1784) and Nieuwe Amstel (1799); it closed in 1810 (see Netherlands, Kingdom of the, §VII, 3...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Austrian family of porcelain painters active also in Italy. Johann Karl Wendelin Anreiter von Zirnfeld (1702–57) moved to Vienna where he worked as a Hausmaler until 1737, when he moved to the newly established Doccia Porcelain Factory as its principal painter. His son Anton (...

Article

Ansbach  

Walter Spiegl

German town in Bavaria, c. 40 km south-east of Nuremberg. Ansbach is known particularly as a centre of ceramics production. A faience factory was established by Matthias Baur and Johann Caspar Ripp in Ansbach c. 1708–10. Wares included jugs and tankards at first decorated in blue and later in the ...

Article

José Meco

Portuguese decorative artist. He was highly active in the second quarter of the 18th century, during the period when High Baroque glazed tiles were produced in the Lisbon factories. His output was enormous, and his work was distributed throughout Portugal and Brazil. In partnership with his son-in-law, the painter ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

French pottery manufactory. In 1744 Jacques Lallemant, Baron d’Aprey, established a pottery on his estate at Aprey (near Dijon.). In 1760 his brother Joseph joined the factory, and the brothers engaged the Swiss pottery painter Protaix Pidoux (who had been working in the Mennecy Porcelain Factory...

Article

Gordon Campbell

French pottery manufactory in Le Castellet, near Apt (about 65 km north of Marseille) established in 1723 by César Moulin, who produced a distinctive marbled yellow-glazed pottery; the designs are modelled on English pottery (perhaps Wedgwood), and look more English than French. The success of this pottery encouraged others to open in and around Apt, which is still an important pottery centre....

Article

Gordon Campbell

French pottery manufactory. In 1737 Baron François Duval established a pottery on his estate of Lamothe; it became a Manufacture Royale in 1749. In 1774 Duval’s son Joseph de Varaire assumed responsibility for the pottery; his death in 1789, together with the advent of the Revolution, marked the end of high quality production, and thereafter only utilitarian white wares were made. The early pottery of Ardus included tableware in the style of Berain. Enamel decoration was introduced in the 1770s, when the pottery’s production included fine pharmacy jars....

Article

Arita  

Hiroko Nishida

Region in Japan, now part of Saga Prefecture, and the name of a type of porcelain first produced there during the early Edo period (1600–1868). The ware was originally known as Imari yaki (‘Imari ware’) because it was shipped from the port of Imari (Saga Prefect.). During the Meiji period (...