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Janis Callen Bell

Italian writer, painter and architect. He was descended from an illustrious Aretine family (his grandfather was Cardinal Benedetto Accolti (1497–1549), Archbishop of Ravenna and Secretary to Pope Clement VII). He was librarian and architect in the service of Cardinal Carlo Medici, and a member of the Florence Accademia and the Accademia di Disegno. He is known for ...

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Italian prelate, diplomat and theorist. He had a successful career as a papal diplomat, serving his uncle Filippo Sega, the Apostolic nuncio to France, in 1591, and later the Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini; from 1621 he was private secretary to Pope Gregory XV, and in ...

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Flemish scientist and architect. His father was a Spaniard, Pedro de Aguilón; his mother, Anna Pels, was of Flemish origin. Aguilonius studied at the Jesuit Collège de Clermont in Paris and at Douai. He entered the novitiate of the Jesuits in Tournai. After a brief visit to Salamanca in ...

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Italian, 17th century, male.

Active in Rome.

Born 1593, in Borgo San Sepolcro.

Painter, sculptor, engraver, art theorist. Religious subjects. Frescoes.

Served as Secretary to the Accademia di San Luca in Rome (founded by Zuccharo). In 1585, he published in Rome a benchmark Treatise on the Noble Art of Painting...

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Helen M. Hills

Italian architect, writer and painter. He trained as a priest in Palermo and entered the Padri Ministri degl’Infermi. Another member of this Order was Giacomo Amato, with whom he worked, although they were not related. While serving as a chaplain Amato studied geometry, architecture, optics and engraving. His earliest known artistic work is a painting on copper of the ...

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Name given to a debate that involved both the arts and the sciences, concerning the notion of progressive improvement since Classical antiquity. Reaching its apogee in 17th-century France, it marked a move away from belief in the supreme authority of antique tradition and example, towards a readiness to question and challenge the accepted norms and propose new approaches. The idea that the modern age might surpass the Antique originated with the 15th-century Florentine humanists and was fuelled by the growth of scientific knowledge in the 16th century; but the Quarrel of the Ancients and Moderns as such erupted in literary circles in late 17th-century France. It essentially concerned the status of writers of the ancient Greek and Roman world: whether they had reached a state of perfection that could not be bettered, as the so-called ‘Ancients’ believed; or whether, as the ‘Moderns’ asserted, the absolute authority of the Antique was open to challenge from later authors....

Article

Tatsushi Takahashi

Dutch writer, painter and etcher. He is now known chiefly as the author of Lof der schilder-konst (Dut.: Praise of painting). Originally a lecture given to Leiden artists on 18 October 1641, St Luke’s Day, it was published the following year. At present virtually no works of art are attributed to this Philips Angel except the etching ...

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An antiquary (Lat. antiquarius) is a lover, collector and student of ancient learning, traditions and remains. Antiquarianism originated from the revived interest in Classical antiquity during the Renaissance and became a scientific and historical method in the 17th century. The difference between literary and non-literary sources distinguishes humanism from antiquarianism, the latter being based on those tangible remains of antiquity (inscriptions, coins and ruins) related to literary sources. From the 16th century new attitudes towards antiquity were discussed in antiquarian circles, later giving rise to antiquarian societies. Thereafter, antiquarianism was firmly linked to archaeological excavations and to the study and collecting of ancient art. It was also linked to the search for a national identity in the arts and for the origins of Western culture and was sustained by a curiosity about civilizations outside Europe. Antiquarianism, in fact, was associated with the ...

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Spanish architect, painter and writer. He was trained in architecture by the Jesuits and in painting by Claudio Coello and worked mainly as an architect. Two overdoors showing multiple allegorical scenes of the Battle of Lepanto (1721; Madrid, Pal. Arzobisp.) and a St Barbara...

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Molly K. Dorkin

Prior to the 20th century, the attribution of works of art was not governed by rigid regulations, and art dealers and auctioneers assigned attributions based purely on aesthetic grounds. Works were attributed to the artist whose manner they most closely resembled, but they were not further distinguished on the basis of quality; as a result, many paintings purchased as Renaissance masterpieces in the 18th or 19th century have since been downgraded to studio works or even much later pastiches....

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French architect, theorist and writer . He trained at the new Académie Royale d’Architecture, Paris, and in 1674 was appointed royal pensionary of the Académie Française in Rome. While travelling by sea from Marseille to Genoa, however, his boat was seized by corsairs and he was detained in Tunis, where he is said to have provided the design for the Sidi Mahrez Mosque. In ...

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English courtier, statesman, lawyer, philosopher and writer . He was the younger son of Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper under Elizabeth I; he was educated at Cambridge and trained as a lawyer at Gray’s Inn, London. He became a member of parliament in 1584; in his political career he enjoyed the patronage of the Queen’s favourite, ...

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Maryvelma O’Neil

Italian painter, draughtsman and writer . He executed canvases and frescoes of religious and mythological subjects, and portraits. He was given important commissions by popes and aristocrats and sold his works to patrons in Italy and abroad. Baglione’s arguably greater fame as a writer derives from ...

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Peter Boutourline Young

Italian writer and architect . He studied medicine and later philosophy at Padua without achieving any academic qualifications. In 1580 he was invited to the court of Mantua by Ferrante Gonzaga (later 1st Duca di Guastalla); in 1585 he was appointed abbot of Guastalla and ordained. In ...

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Edward L. Goldberg

Italian businessman, art historian, collector and writer . He was born into a pious and moderately prosperous Florentine commercial family and educated by the Jesuits. He reluctantly abandoned his studies and a religious vocation for a lifelong career as a business agent and bookkeeper for local noble families, an occupation that provided him with many acquaintances in cultivated Florentine society. He had many friends among writers, including the painter and dialect poet Lorenzo Lippi, and painters, including Matteo Rosselli, Baccio del Bianco, Baldassare Franceschini and Carlo Dolci. He was an amateur artist himself with considerable skill in drawing and clay modelling and made chalk portraits of Tuscan notables (one set extant; Florence, Uffizi) and copies of venerated religious images. As a collector, he assembled two successive collections of mainly Florentine drawings from the 14th to the 17th century, with an emphasis on the later 16th century and early 17th. The first collection (Florence, Uffizi) was ceded to ...

Article

Joseph Connors

Italian engineer and architect . From 1588 he is recorded in the service of Philip II of Spain as a military engineer. His most important commission was for the Palazzo della Giustizia (New Prison; c. 1570–after 1624) in Milan, its varied massing and powerful entrance portal proclaiming Spanish hegemony over Milan. In ...

Article

Louise Rice

Italian jurist and amateur architect . A learned dilettante active during the reign of Pope Paul V, he wrote and illustrated a series of proposals for the improvement and embellishment of St Peter’s, Rome. His Discorso was composed in 1620, and in 1623, following the election of Urban VIII, his designs were published at the expense of his nephew ...

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Claire Pace

Italian antiquarian, biographer, critic and theorist. He was brought up by the antiquarian Francesco Angeloni, whose private museum included an extensive archaeological collection, paintings, prints and 600 drawings by Annibale Carracci. In Angeloni’s circle were leading scholars and artists, such as the classical theorist Giovanni Battista Agucchi and Domenichino, with whom Bellori may have studied painting. Bellori’s only known work is the original design of a landscape (inscribed with his name) in a series of eight small etchings by ...

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Christiaan Schuckman

Flemish writer and lawyer. He was the son of the painter Adriaan de Bie (1594–1668) and Clara van Bortel and spent most of his life in his birthplace, where he practised as a notary. He married twice and had 14 children. His fame rests on his authorship of 50 or more books, particularly ...

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Christopher Tadgell

French engineer, architect, teacher and writer. He was born to a newly ennobled member of the household of the queen-mother, Marie de’ Medici. He joined the army and became a military engineer, attaining the rank of Maréchal de Camp by 1652. In that year he was seconded by one of the secretaries of state for foreign affairs, the Comte de Brienne, to accompany his son on a comprehensive Grand Tour of Europe. On his return in ...