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Seating area of an ancient Greek or Roman theatre (see Theatre, fig.).

Article

Chevron  

John Thomas

Form of three-dimensional zigzag ornament particularly associated with Anglo-Norman Romanesque architecture, where it was used to decorate arches, doorways and windows. An equivalent term is dancette (or dancetty), although this is generally reserved for the zigzags used in heraldry. The stripes and flashes set on to the sleeves of military uniform tunics are also chevrons. Architectural chevron is possibly related to ...

Article

Element at the side of an image, especially in panoramic landscapes, which directs the spectator’s eye towards the central view in the distance. The term derives from those pieces of stage scenery that mask the wings of the theatre and create an illusion of recession (...

Article

Term used in an art-historical context to describe art forms that include a variety of media, often unconventional. It is used mainly where a complete description of media would be too lengthy. Multimedia may also comprise live or Performance art, Happenings, Environmental art, Video art...

Article

Area in a theatre between the stage and the audience’s seating area. In the ancient Greek theatre this was a large circular space used by the chorus and dancers in the ancient Roman theatre it was semicircular and reserved as seating for distinguished spectators in the modern theatre it is a narrow space, usually sunken (the ‘pit’), for musicians....

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Parodos  

Lateral passage in an ancient Greek theatre, dividing the Theatron from the Skene.

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Skene  

Stage in an ancient Greek theatre .

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Sky art  

Astrid A. Hiemer

Term coined by Otto Piene in 1969 and described by him as: ‘The arbitrator between man-made feelings and emotions and yearnings evoked by earth and sky and their overwhelming size and power …. Technology helps to distribute and connect while we keep it from dulling the senses and numbing our imagination’ (see ...

Article

Auditorium in an ancient Greek theatre.