1-20 of 45 results  for:

  • Textiles and Embroidery x
  • 1500–1600 x
Clear all

Article

Elise L. Smith

Flemish tapestry-maker. He was the son of Pieter van Edingen Aelst, also a weaver of tapestries, and a member of his father’s workshop in Brussels. In 1509 he was cited as a restorer of Margaret of Austria’s collection of tapestries. In 1517 he was paid for tapestries of David and John the Baptist made for ...

Article

Anna Nilsén

Painter and textile designer, active in Sweden. He was probably of German origin. He married in 1473 and was a burgher of Stockholm, where he ran a workshop for liturgical embroidery. Apparently well-to-do, during the years 1501–7 he paid a higher tax than any other painter in Stockholm. About this time he also seems to have delivered an altarpiece to the Brigittine convent of Naantali (Swed. Nådendal) in Finland. He is last mentioned in ...

Article

Alcaraz  

Gordon Campbell

Spanish centre of carpet production in Murcia. Alcaraz was one of the two principal centres (together with Cuenca) of carpet production in 15th- and 16th-century Spain. The hand-knotted carpets are tied with a single-warp symmetrical knot (known as the Spanish knot) on an undyed woollen foundation. Several surviving 15th-century examples imitate Turkish carpets of the ‘Holbein’ variety, but the colouring is often different (Turkish red being replaced by blue and gold) and in the borders the Kufic inscriptions are replaced by geometrical or floral patterns. In the 16th century the red colouring became less vivid, possibly because of problems with the cochineal dye imported from Mexico. There was considerable variety of design, but in the 15th century the most common pattern consisted of wheels in rectangular compartments; in the 16th century the wheels softened into wreaths and the compartments assumed a variety of shapes or disappeared altogether....

Article

See Robbia, della family

Article

Thomas Dacosta Kaufmann

Italian painter, draughtsman and tapestry designer, active also in Austria and Bohemia. He came from a distinguished Milanese family that included a number of archbishops of the city; his father was the painter Biagio Arcimboldo. Giuseppe is first documented in 1549, working with his father for Milan Cathedral; he received payments until ...

Article

Paul Huvenne

South Netherlandish painter, draughtsman, designer, architect, civil engineer, cartographer and engraver. He is said to have trained as a bricklayer, and the trowel he used to add as his housemark next to his monogram lab testifies to this and to his pretensions as an architectural designer. In ...

Article

Brigitte Volk-Knüttel

Netherlandish painter, tapestry designer and draughtsman, active in Italy and Germany. He was one of several Italian-trained Mannerist artists employed by the courts of Europe and was the leading figure in Munich from 1600 to 1628. His versatility led Sandrart to describe him as a ‘universal painter’. When he was about ten years old he emigrated to Florence with his parents—his father, ...

Article

French, 16th century, male.

Born in Toulouse.

Draughtsman. Patterns (embroidery).

Celle lived in Italy towards the middle of the 16th century. He designed patterns for embroidery and is only known through an undated quarto volume containing 25 sheets and 54 linen and embroidery patterns. The title (19 lines) states ...

Article

David Blayney Brown

German painter, designer, illustrator and printmaker. He probably studied first in the Low Countries. He was perhaps in Denmark c.1611, but then spent four years in Italy, mainly in Rome and Venice, where he met the English ambassador Sir Henry Wotton. By 1617 he was living in Copenhagen; an inscribed drawing of ...

Article

South Netherlandish painter, sculptor, architect and designer of woodcuts, stained glass and tapestries. Son of the Deputy Mayor of the village of Aelst, he was married twice, first to Anna van Dornicke (d 1529), the daughter of the Antwerp painter Jan Mertens, who may have been his teacher; they had two children, Michel van Coecke and ...

Article

Wouter Th. Kloek and Leonard J. Slatkes

Dutch family of artists. With a striking, personal style that sets him apart from his contemporaries, (1) Dirck Crabeth was the most important Dutch stained-glass artist of the 16th century. His younger brother (2) Wouter Crabeth (i) was a less individual designer, whose work has a pleasant spaciousness, but the rendering of detail is not always satisfactory. The impressive windows (...

Article

See Crabeth family

Article

S. J. Turner

French painter and draughtsman. He was a pupil at Fontainebleau of Ruggiero de Ruggieri (d after 1597) and was also trained by Martin Fréminet’s father Médéric Fréminet, a rather mediocre painter in Paris. Dubreuil became Premier Peintre to Henry IV and is usually identified as a member of the so-called second ...

Article

Enghien  

Erik Duverger

Belgian town in Hainault, approximately halfway between Brussels and Tournai. Tapestry production in Enghien probably began in the late 14th century or early 15th. Michiel Betten is mentioned as early as 1410 as a tapestryworker, and Herman Betten in 1445, although it is not clear whether or not the industry was well established at this time. The weavers of Enghien had, however, already gained a certain reputation: during the first half of the 15th century two tapestryworkers were resident in Brussels who may have originally come from Enghien....

Article

French, 16th century, male.

Born c. 1530, probably in Paris; died after 1590.

Painter, draughtsman, embroiderer.

School of Lyons.

Pierre was the son of Jacob Eskrich, a native of Freiburg-im-Brisgau and engraver who worked in Paris in the first quarter of the 16th century and whose real name seems to have been Krug ('jug' in German, hence his nickname). Pierre Eskrich must have arrived in Lyons in about ...

Article

Danielle B. Joyner

From the time John Cassian established the first female foundation in Marseille in ad 410, monastic women lived in varying states of enclosure and were surrounded by diverse images and objects that contributed to their devotion, education and livelihood. The first rule for women, written in 512 by St Caesarius of Arles, emphasized their strict separation from men and the world, as did the ...

Article

Italian, 15th – 16th century, female.

Born 1448, in Genoa; died 1534.

Painter.

Tommasina del Fiesco was also an embroiderer. She took holy orders after the death of her husband, first entering the convent of S Maria delle Grazie and later that of SS Giacomo e Filippo. A number of her small pictures on parchment are in the convent of S Silvestro....

Article

Jane S. Peters

German painter, miniature painter, and woodcut and tapestry designer. He was probably the son of Matthias, a Nördlingen shoemaker known as Geiger (d 1521), and probably served an apprenticeship in Nördlingen with Hans Schäufelein. By 1525 he was established as an artist in Lauingen, then part of the Duchy of Neuburg, where he appears annually in the tax register until ...

Article

See Robbia, della family

Article

See Robbia, della family