1-20 of 39 results  for:

  • Textiles and Embroidery x
  • 1600–1700 x
Clear all

Article

Gordon Campbell

Type of lace produced in France. In 1675 a group of 30 Venetian lacemakers was settled in the Norman town of Alençon by Jean-Baptiste Colbert (Louis XIV’s minister of finance). The Venetians instructed local needlewomen in point de Venise, but by the 1690s the distinctive local style known as ...

Article

Maria Natália Correia Guedes

Portuguese centre of carpet production; also the name applied to carpets made elsewhere in the same tradition. Arraiolos carpets are embroidered with strands of thick wool, or more rarely silk, on linen, jute or hemp canvas, using a large-eyed needle and a long-armed cross stitch, which gives the effect of braiding. The reverse side of the carpet shows no trace of finishing off and appears to be hatched. The pattern is drawn on squared paper, and then the main points of reference are marked on the canvas by counting the threads. The border and all the motifs are first outlined and then filled; the background is embroidered last. The carpet is finished with a continuous plain or polychrome edging of looped or cut fringe. In the days when natural dyes were used, the colours were predominantly red, blue and yellow, obtained from brazil-wood, indigo, dyer’s weed or spurge respectively. Originally the carpets were used to cover the floor of the hall or bedroom in noble houses and were surrounded by a strip of polished wooden floor....

Article

Jérôme de la Gorce

French designer, ornamentalist and engraver. The Berain family moved to Paris c. 1644. Berain’s father, also called Jean Berain, and his uncle Claude Berain were master gunsmiths. In 1659 Berain published a series of designs for the decoration of arms, Diverses pièces très utiles pour les arquebuzières...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Type of lace made since the 17th century at Binche, near Brussels and Valenciennes, both of whose laces it resembles. It is a heavy lace with decorative grounds, and was used for bedspreads and as a costume trimming. The name has since become the generic term for the type of lace once made at Binche....

Article

Style of silk woven in Europe, especially Italy, France and England, in the late 17th century and early 18th. The bizarre style had its origins in the rich mix of images provided by the goods imported into Europe from the Near and Far East by the Levant Company and the East India companies of France, Holland and England. An insatiable market for novelty and richness had been established at the courts of Louis XIV and Charles II, and other monarchs who followed their lead. The silks woven to satisfy that demand began to appear in the late 1680s; chinoiseries and vegetable forms derived from Indian textiles began to be mixed with European floral sprigs. By the mid-1690s, the plant forms, although still small, were becoming more angular and elongated, with an increasingly vigorous left-right movement. The patterns, typically asymmetrical, were brocaded with metal threads on damask grounds, which were already patterned with even stranger motifs....

Article

French, 17th – 18th century, male.

Active in Paris.

Born 1671; died 1743, in Paris.

Painter, embroidery designer.

Nicolas Boucher was the father of François Boucher.

Article

Isabelle Denis

French town in the Gironde département, on the River Garonne. A notable tapestry workshop was briefly in existence at the château of Cadillac in the 17th century. The Director, Claude de la Pierre (1605–60), previously head of a workshop in the Faubourg S Marcel, Paris, had been engaged by the ...

Article

Brigitte Volk-Knüttel

Netherlandish painter, tapestry designer and draughtsman, active in Italy and Germany. He was one of several Italian-trained Mannerist artists employed by the courts of Europe and was the leading figure in Munich from 1600 to 1628. His versatility led Sandrart to describe him as a ‘universal painter’. When he was about ten years old he emigrated to Florence with his parents—his father, ...

Article

David Blayney Brown

German painter, designer, illustrator and printmaker. He probably studied first in the Low Countries. He was perhaps in Denmark c.1611, but then spent four years in Italy, mainly in Rome and Venice, where he met the English ambassador Sir Henry Wotton. By 1617 he was living in Copenhagen; an inscribed drawing of ...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born 14 March 1621, in Chaumont (Haute-Marne); died 26 December 1681, in Toulon.

Embroiderer, painter.

He was the younger brother of Alexandre Defrance. He left Chaumont to settle with his family in Toulon, where he worked as a master embroiderer. It was in this capacity that the navy commissioned him in ...

Article

Flemish glass-painter, draughtsman, painter and tapestry designer. His reputation rests primarily on his drawings and oil sketches, of which several hundred survive, intended mainly as designs for stained-glass windows and prints. He was strongly influenced by the work of other important Flemish artists of the late 16th century and early 17th, notably Rubens, whose motifs and stylistic elements he frequently reworked in his own compositions....

Article

Dimity  

Gordon Campbell

Stout cotton fabric, woven with raised stripes or fancy figures. Early examples are Italian, but dimity was manufactured in England from the 17th century, usually to be used undyed for beds and bedroom hangings, and sometimes for clothing.

Article

S. J. Turner

French painter and draughtsman. He was a pupil at Fontainebleau of Ruggiero de Ruggieri (d after 1597) and was also trained by Martin Fréminet’s father Médéric Fréminet, a rather mediocre painter in Paris. Dubreuil became Premier Peintre to Henry IV and is usually identified as a member of the so-called second ...

Article

C. von Bogendorf Rupprath

Dutch painter. Duyster was the eldest of four children of Cornelis Dircksz. and his second wife, Hendrikge Jeronimus, from Gramsberge, Norway. His father is recorded as a textile cutter, house carpenter and minor Amsterdam official. In 1620 the family, which also included two children from Cornelis’s first marriage, moved into a house in the Koningstraat named ‘De Duystere Werelt’ (‘The Dark World’), which gave Duyster and his half-brother Dirck their adopted surname. The family name first appears in a document dated ...

Article

Hans Vlieghe

Flemish painter and tapestry designer. He was initially a pupil of Caspar van den Hoecke (d 1648). After a period in Italy, sometime after 1618, he joined the workshop of Peter Paul Rubens. He is one of the few artists whose collaboration with Rubens is documented. He is mentioned several times between ...

Article

Candace J. Adelson

Flemish tapestry-weaver. He was working in Paris in 1619, when he was invited by Cosimo II, Grand Duke of Tuscany, to go to Florence to assist in the revival of tapestry-weaving. Fevère, who knew both the high- and low-warp techniques, was given a workshop in the Palazzo Vecchio. In ...

Article

French, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born c. 1639; died 3 July 1711.

Painter.

He is mentioned as being a 'painter and embroiderer of the venerable clerics of Langres'. He was associated with Claude Gillot.

Article

See Vinne, van der family

Article

Flemish School, 17th century, male.

Born 1636, in Mechelen; died 1682, in Mechelen.

Painter. Architectural views. Decorative schemes, designs for tapestries (?).

Daniel Janssens was a pupil of Jac van Hornes and was a master artist in Mechelen in 1660. His pupils included Gillis Vermeulen in Antwerp in ...

Article

R. A. D’Hulst

Flemish painter, tapestry designer and draughtsman. In the context of 17th-century Flemish art, he emerges as a somewhat complicated figure. His oeuvre, the fruit of a continual artistic development, is characterized by great stylistic versatility, to which the length of his career contributed. His religious, mythological and historical representations evolved from the rhetorical prolixity of the Baroque into a vernacular, sometimes almost caricatural, formal idiom. The lack of idealistic treatment in his work is undoubtedly the factor that most removed Jordaens’s art from that of his great Flemish contemporaries Rubens and van Dyck. Jordaens’s officially commissioned works included many paintings in which the sublimity of the subject-matter clashed with the vulgarity of some of his figures. Unlike Rubens and van Dyck, both of whom were knighted in the course of their careers, Jordaens was, in fact, completely ignored by the courts of Spain and Brussels, and he did not receive a single significant commission from Italy, France or England. Only once did Charles I of England grant him a commission, and then under less favourable circumstances (...