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A. Krista Sykes

American architect and teacher. Born in Oak Park, IL (home of numerous early works by Frank Lloyd Wright), Beeby moved with his family to Philadelphia before they relocated to England, where he completed high school. Beeby returned to the USA to attend Cornell University, earning a Bachelor of Architecture in ...

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Christian F. Otto

American architect of German birth. Franzen was a major figure of the first postwar generation of American architects, among them Paul Rudolph, Harry Cobb, John M(aclane) Johansen, and Philip Johnson. Franzen immigrated with his family to the United States in 1936. His architectural training and experience was shaped by modernists: Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (Franzen received his MArch in ...

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Elizabeth Meredith Dowling

American architect, teacher, historian, and writer of South African birth. Greenberg’s quiet, gentlemanly demeanor reflected the time-honored traditional and classical architecture he created over four decades. His stylistic choices are rooted in research and aesthetics. His fascination with 18th- and 19th-century American architecture is related to its genesis in the American Revolution and the commitment of those architects to expressing American democratic ideals in architectural form....

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Margaret Moore Booker

The Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) and the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) constitute a public archival collection consisting of more than 556,900 measured drawings, large-format photographs and written histories for more than 38,600 historic structures and sites in the US dating from Pre-Columbian times to the 20th century. Maintained by the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., the HABS collection is one of the largest national surveys of its kind in the world. It serves as a vital resource for students of American architecture and is a crucial aid to historic preservationists. Its success reflects the importance and great need to document America’s surviving architectural and engineering masterpieces, particularly those that might be threatened with alteration, demolition or development....

Article

HOK  

Deborah A. Middleton

American architecture, engineering and interior design firm. Through the acquisition of other leading firms HOK expanded worldwide and in the early 21st century was recognized as the largest architectural firm in the world since 1998, with revenues of over $1 billion annually.

The firm was founded by George Hellmuth (...

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Sean Keller

American architect. Holl studied architecture at the University of Washington, followed by studies in Rome and at the Architectural Association in London. In 1976 he established the firm Steven Holl Architects in New York. Holl is the author of numerous books, including Anchoring (1989...

Article

Peter L. Laurence

American journalist, author and activist. In 1934, at the age of 18, she moved to New York City to pursue a writing career. A life-long lover and student of cities, she soon settled in Greenwich Village and was struck by the vibrancy of the city, even in the Great Depression. Jazz-Age Manhattan, with its new Chrysler and Empire State Buildings and the Rockefeller Center, would leave an indelible impression on her, becoming her exemplar of urban life and city planning. Self-educated except for a few years at Columbia University, Jacobs not only was fascinated by the physical, social and economic dynamics of city life, but read widely in science, particularly natural history; from her earliest writings on the city, in the 1930s and 1940s, she observed the built environment like a naturalist, seeing the evolution of city form and function through a collective design process. Following this belief, Jacobs passionately rejected both Beaux-Arts and modernist conceptions of city planning and civic design as architecture writ large, and all other authorial attempts to design the city like a ...

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Ethel Goodstein-Murphree

American architect and educator. In 1990, the American Institute of Architects awarded its highest honor, the Gold Medal, to Jones (see AIA Gold Medal). By then, Jones had earned acclaim for his Thorncrown Chapel, (Eureka Springs, AR, 1978–80), described by Robert Ivy, in the biography, ...

Article

Julia Robinson

Swedish–American engineer. Klüver was known for his important collaborations with artists at the dawn of media art. Having grown up in Sweden, he came to the USA in 1954, and pursued a PhD in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. After relocating to the East Coast, he worked as a staff scientist at Bell Telephone Laboratories (...

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Tom Williams

American sculptor and installation artist. He studied architecture and mathematics at California State University and art at the Los Angeles College of Art and Design in 1963 before going on to receive a BFA in 1964 and an MFA in 1967 from the Otis Art Institute of Los Angeles County. He is often regarded as a key contributor to the development of Post-minimalism and ...

Article

Deborah A. Middleton

American architectural partnership based in Atlanta, GA, formed by Mack Scogin (b Atlanta, GA, 13 Nov 1943) and Merrill Elam (b Nashville, TN, 28 June 1943). Mack Scogin Merrill Elam is an innovative architectural practice whose modern contemporary designs reflect concerns for the bounding of spatial experience. The firm was established in Atlanta, GA, originally as Scogin and Parker (...

Article

Christian Dagg

American educator, architect and artist working in the American Southeast. Mockbee attended architecture school at Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama, graduating in 1974. He formed a partnership with Coleman Coker in 1983. In 1995, the work of that firm was published in a book entitled “Mockbee/Coker, Thought and Process.” The body of work exhibited in that publication was described by Mockbee as “contemporary Modernism grounded in Southern culture.” Mockbee became well known for a personal architectural style reminiscent of barns, dogtrots and other common structures. It was often labeled as regionalist and relied on vernacular forms such as broad overhangs, gabled roofs and materials not typically used on residential projects. “I’m drawn to anything that has a quirkiness to it, a mystery to it,” Mockbee said. The Barton House designed in Madison County, Mississippi received recognition in the ...

Article

Jill L. Grant

Architectural, urban design and planning movement that began in the USA in the 1980s; by the turn of the century it had become a highly influential alternative to conventional development practices in the USA and beyond.

In the early 1980s a design and planning movement took root in the USA that proponents described either as the “return of the small town” or as the “next form of the American metropolis.” Architect-planners like Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk (...

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Christopher C. Mead

American architect. Predock was a leading architect of the American Southwest, who applied lessons learned in the desert to commissions across North America, Europe, North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. In 2006, the American Institute of Architects awarded him its highest honor, the AIA Gold Medal...

Article

Kate Wight

An international prize awarded annually for achievements in architecture. It is considered the world’s most celebrated architectural award and has sometimes been referred to as the “Nobel Prize of Architecture.”

Cindy and Jay Pritzker of Chicago founded the prize in 1979. The Pritzker Prize was sponsored and awarded by the Hyatt Foundation, an extension of the Pritzker family business, the Hyatt Corporation, best known for Hyatt Hotels....

Article

Zambian town planner and teacher. Denise Lakofski was the first child of a Latvian Jewish father, Shim Lakofski, and his Lithuanian-born wife, Phyllis (née Hepker), who had come to Africa to seek their fortune in mining. In 1933 the family (including a son and two daughters) moved to Johannesburg, where, at the instigation of Phyllis, they built an ...

Article

American architectural practice in Boston, MA. Shepley Bulfinch Richardson & Abbott is the fifth iteration of the firm founded by H(enry) H(obson) Richardson when he moved his practice from Manhattan to Brookline, MA, in 1874. On Richardson’s death in 1886, his colleagues assumed his practice, moved the firm into Boston and changed the name to ...

Article

Robert M. Craig

American architectural partnership founded in 1919 as Burge and Stevens, becoming Stevens & Wilkinson in 1947. Stevens & Wilkinson was the dominant progressive architectural firm in Atlanta, and effectively throughout Georgia, during the years immediately following World War II when Modern architecture emerged in the Southeast. The firm exemplifies the kind of transition which marked many American architectural practices during the period, when traditional design gave way to a more progressive aesthetic. Stevens & Wilkinson is the longest continually active firm in Atlanta’s history....

Article

George Barnett Johnston

American indexed catalog of building components and manufacturers published annually since 1906. This multi-volume series, which organizes building product information, details, and specifications, is a standard reference for architecture, engineering, and construction industry professionals. It was launched as “Sweet’s” Indexed Catalogue of Building Construction in ...

Article

Matico Josephson

American architectural firm formed by Frank Lloyd Wright’s apprentices, the Taliesin Fellows, to complete Wright’s work after his death in 1959, and then to continue his legacy. Based primarily in Scottsdale, AZ, the office was first called Taliesin Associated Architects, and changed its name to Taliesin Architects in ...