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Swiss, 19th century, male.

Born 13 November 1786, in Schaffhausen; died 15 August 1868.

Draughtsman, glass painter.

Hans Jacob Beck studied under the landscape artist, Wetzel, in Zurich, and set himself up as an artist in Schaffhausen in 1818.

Schaffhausen (Mus. zu Allerheiligen): 80 items...

Article

Priscilla Boniface

Room or building for the display of plants, often used as a living area (sometimes known as a ‘winter garden’) and frequently attached to a house. The distinctions between the conservatory and other forms of glass house (see Greenhouse and Orangery) were blurred until well into the 19th century, when a conservatory was usually interpreted as an ornamental, glazed living room decorated with plants. On ...

Article

Gazebo  

Tim Mowl

Garden house built on a terrace, with views to a road outside or the distant countryside. Until the 1830s, when ‘belvedere’ became the more acceptable term, small turrets on a roof-top were also described as gazebos, as were Maltese mirador windows. The term, with its implied meaning ‘I will look out’, was coined whimsically in the early 18th century using the Latin future tense ending, but the type of structure it describes developed in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I from the less ambitious forms of the medieval garden mount....

Article

Priscilla Boniface

Building for the protection, propagation and cultivation of plants. Greenhouses, probably roofed in mica, existed in Roman times. During the 16th century, the beginnings of the application of science to plant-growing, which led to the development of the Botanic garden in Europe, encouraged the construction of greenhouses. In ‘houses’ formed of a ‘hot bed’ of such heat-generating substances as bark or dung, situated against a south wall and ‘roofed’ with ...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 2 November 1876, in Paris; died 31 December 1958.

Painter, designer, engraver. Genre scenes, nudes, landscapes, gardens, still-lifes. Designs (wallpapers/fabrics), designs for stained glass, theatre decoration.

Art Deco.

Francis Jourdain was the son of the writer, art critic and architect Franz Jourdain. He studied painting and colour engraving under Henri C. Guérard, and worked in the evenings at the studio of Eugène Carrière. He also studied under Albert Besnard and collaborated with him for three months on the decoration of the chapel of the Berck hospice. He took part in exhibitions of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts and was made an associate member of the Society. With his father - for many years the president - he was one of the founder members of the Salon d'Automne. He collaborated on the magazine ...

Article

Priscilla Boniface

Building for the protection of tender plants, particularly orange trees, in cold weather. By the 18th century the interpretation of the name and function had gradually expanded to include any ‘house’ the purpose of which was to contain plants for display (see also Conservatory...

Article

John Kenworthy-Browne and Lin Barton

English horticulturalist, garden designer, and architect. He established his reputation as a gardener at Chatsworth House, Derbys, where he developed new construction techniques for glasshouses. This work inspired his acclaimed and influential ‘Crystal Palace’, which housed the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London (see fig....

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 20 April 1920, in Paris; died 2000.

Painter, watercolourist, lithographer, illustrator. Figures, nudes, portraits, interiors, landscapes, landscapes with figures, urban landscapes, gardens, waterscapes, seascapes, still-lifes, flowers. Decorative panels, designs for stained glass.

Maurice Robert Savary was a pupil of Nicolas Untersteller and Maurice Brianchon at the École des Beaux-Arts, Paris, from 1940 to 1949. He spent time in Madrid from 1948 to 1949, then went to Italy, returning with the Prix de Rome. He was then appointed a professor at the École des Beaux-Arts, Rouen. From 1957 he lived in Paris and passed most of his summers in Collioure. He won a number of awards, including: 1950, the First Grand Prix de Rome; 1948, the Casa Velázquez prize, Madrid; 1957, the international prize at the Menton Biennale; 1975, gold medal at the Salon des artistes Français, Paris; 1982, medal at the Academie des Beaux-Arts Institut de France; 1985, silver medal at the Salon de la Marine, Paris, and a gold medal two years later....

Article

Mairead Dunlevy

Irish city and centre of glass production. The earliest Waterford glass factory was established in Gurteens, near Waterford, during the 1720s, and production included lead-glass drinking vessels with pedestal stems, garden glasses, vials, bottles and other green glassware. The factory was closed about 1739.

In ...