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Article

French, 16th century, male.

Died before 1564.

Potter. Decorative motifs.

Mentioned in documents from 1526, Abaquesne was the first ceramicist to set up in Rouen. His work shows the influence of Italian models. He made a series of panels for the chateau of Écouen and the chapel at La Bastie d'Urfé....

Article

Yves Bottineau-Fuchs and Gordon Campbell

French potter based in Rouen. It is not known how he became a potter; he may have trained in the Italian workshops at the Château de Madrid in the Bois de Boulogne, Paris, where Girolamo della Robbia was employed, or he may have worked under the direction of Flemish masters. There is, however, ansout obvious Italian influence on his work. Nothing is known of his work prior to the ornamental tiles and tiled pavings at the château of Ecouen, which are in the style of the Fontainebleau school (...

Article

See Robbia, della family

Article

Carmen Ravanelli Guidotti

Italian potter. He probably learnt the rudiments of pottery at Pavia and seems to have moved to Gubbio c. 1490, together with his brothers Giovanni Andreoli (d c. 1535) and Salimbene Andreoli (d c. 1522). He became a citizen of Gubbio in ...

Article

Claire Dumortier

South Netherlandish potter of Italian birth. He probably worked in Venice before settling in Antwerp at the beginning of the 16th century (see Antwerp, §III, 2). In 1512 he purchased a house called De Groote Aren in the Oude Veemerct and in 1520...

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Born in S Angelo de Vado.

Painter, stucco artist, potter. Wall decorations.

Agostino Appolloni studied painting at the studio of his uncle Lucio Dolce, who made him his heir. Appolloni then founded a pottery at Castel-Durante. In 1585 he executed mural paintings and stucco work for the church of S Francesco in Castel-Durante....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Spanish potter born in Navarre and settled in Seville, where he became a prominent maker of azulejos. His tiles for the Alcázar include two remarkable sets installed in the Palacio Gótico between 1577 and 1583, one depicting the Conquest of Tunis. His panel of the ...

Article

Wendy M. Watson

Italian maiolica painter . More is known about Avelli than any other maiolica painter because of his many signed works and the autobiographical details included in his sonnets in honour of Francesco Maria I della Rovere, Duke of Urbino. Avelli considered himself to be not only an artist but also a poet and courtier. His intellectual abilities set him apart from his colleagues, even if as a painter he was not the most talented. He seems never to have directed his own workshop, but he is known to have worked in Urbino from ...

Article

Italian, 16th – 17th century, male.

Active in Reggio.

Sculptor.

In 1573, Vincenzo Bagnoli executed a life-size clay statue of a certain Graziano for the monks of S Procolo in Bologna. In 1584 he worked at Ferrara Cathedral and in 1604 at the Rosario church in Amandola....

Article

French, 16th century, male.

Active in Tours.

Sculptor. Painted statues.

In 1519 Nicolas Baschet made a series of terracotta figures depicting Jean Thinel, the King of France, and the Queen, as well as a group of painted and gilded statues representing a Madonna and Child...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Type of German glazed stoneware jug produced from the 15th century through to the 19th, and known in English from the 17th century as the bellarmine, the eponym of which was Cardinal Roberto Bellarmino (1542–1621), who was detested in England because of his anti-Protestant polemics. The jugs, which are decorated with the moulded face of a bearded man (sometimes with a coat-of-arms below it) are also known as ‘Greybeards’ and as ‘d’Alva bottles’; the latter name alludes to the third Duke of Alba (...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Italian potter. He was born in Ascanio and worked in Faenza, initially with Virgiliotto Calamelli, from whose widow he bought the workshop in 1570. Bettisi made huge maiolica services, including one of several hundred pieces made for Albert V of Bavaria in 1576; there is a broad-rimmed bowl from this service in Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. His wares and those of his workshop are marked ‘Don Pino’....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Type of maiolica covered with a thick white glaze. Bianchi ware was often extravagantly shaped and pierced but tended to be lightly decorated, usually in blue and orange. The decorative technique was known as compendiario (It.: ‘perfunctory’) and characteristically consisted of boldly drawn figures which left most of the glazed surface untouched. It was introduced in the Faenza potteries in the 1540s but was eventually produced all over Europe. The most prominent Faenza manufacturers of ...

Article

Bizen  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese centre of ceramics production. High-fired ceramic wares were manufactured from the end of the 12th century in and around the village of Inbe, Bizen Province (now Okayama Prefect.). This region had been a centre for manufacturing Sue-style stonewares and Haji-style earthenwares from the 6th century ...

Article

Boccaro  

Gordon Campbell

Scented red earthenware brought originally by the Portuguese from Mexico; the word derives from Portuguese búcaro (clay cup). The term also denotes similar earthenware made in Portugal and Spain (especially Talavera) from the 16th to the 18th centuries, and the imitation made by Johann Friedrich Böttger...

Article

Claire Dumortier

Belgian centre of ceramics production, near Charleroi. Potters were working in Bouffioulx from the 13th to the 15th century. The first mention of a master potter at Bouffioulx was in 1528, brown and grey salt-glazed stoneware being made from c. 1530. During the first half of the 16th century wares produced included tankards with ovoid bodies (often decorated with a figure) and ovoid pitchers, sometimes with three handles and decorated with three faces. During the second half of the 16th century production also included ...

Article

Italian, 15th – 16th century, male.

Active in Florence.

Born 1461; died 1521.

Sculptor.

He principally produced works in terracotta.

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Active in Florence.

Born 1494; died 1576.

Sculptor.

He worked chiefly in terracotta.

Article

Carmen Ravanelli Guidotti

Italian ceramic factory. In 1498 a maiolica factory was established in the Medici villa of Cafaggiolo, in the Mugello near Florence, by the brothers Piero and Stefano Schiavon family from Montelupo, a famous Tuscan centre of ceramics production. The factory was in production throughout the 16th century, and the products made for the grand dukes of Tuscany and other noble Florentine families reveal a remarkable pictorial zeal, which developed from decorative schemes influenced by the style of wares from Faenza, including ...

Article

Carmen Ravanelli Guidotti

Italian potter. He was the son of Giovanni da Calamello, and there are plenty of documents relating to him, especially after 1540, when as a practising potter he went to sell his wares in Bologna. He was so successful that citizenship was conferred on him. In ...