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Article

Sheila S. Blair

Persian family of potters. The family is sometimes known, somewhat improperly, by the epithet Kashani [al-Kashani, Qashani], which refers to their home town, Kashan. It was a major centre for the production of lustre pottery in medieval Iran, and they were among the leading potters there, working in both the Monumental and the Miniature styles (...

Article

See Abu Tahir family

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Article

Bizen  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese centre of ceramics production. High-fired ceramic wares were manufactured from the end of the 12th century in and around the village of Inbe, Bizen Province (now Okayama Prefect.). This region had been a centre for manufacturing Sue-style stonewares and Haji-style earthenwares from the 6th century ...

Article

Chancay  

Jane Feltham

Pre-Columbian culture of South America. It centred on the Chancay Valley of the central Peruvian coast, ranging north and south to the Fortaleza and Lurín valleys, and is known for its distinctive pottery and textile styles. Chancay culture flourished between c. ad 1100 and 1470...

Article

Echizen  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan, based on some 20 kiln sites 7 km north-west of the city of Takefu (Fukui Prefect.). Echizen is known as one of Japan’s ‘Six Old Kilns’. It is one of three centres that arose in the area (the others being Kaga and Suzu) in the 12th century in response to increased agricultural production. Ceramics appeared in Fukui Prefecture in the 6th century ...

Article

George Bankes

Pre-Columbian culture of South America that extended throughout several valleys on the south coast of Peru and flourished between c. ad 1000 and 1476. The Ica–Chincha pottery style was first recognized by the German archaeologist Max Uhle, and regional variations have since been defined by archaeologists from the University of California at Berkeley, especially by ...

Article

Regina Krahl

Town and county seat in north-east Jiangxi Province, China, and the country’s main centre of porcelain production. For most of its existence the town was part of Fouliang, in Raozhou Prefecture, and in historical records its ceramics are generally referred to as Raozhou ware. With a continuous history of manufacturing porcelain from the Tang period (...

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Jizhou  

Peter Hardie

Site in central Jiangxi Province, China, and former centre of ceramic production. Jizhou is the Sui- to Song-period (581–1279) name for modern Ji’an, a town on the Ganjiang River, which flows northwards into the Yangzi Basin. Ceramic kilns operated from at least the Tang period (...

Article

Lyveden  

Michael R. McCarthy

English centre of ceramic production. Excavations have revealed potters’ settlements dating to between the 13th century and early 15th at Lyveden in the Rockingham Forest, Northants. The tenements incorporated workshops with hearths, deposits of unused clay in stone-lined pits, drains, industrial waste, kilns, knives, hones and a bone stamp. Sometimes clays from within the tenement boundary were used with such tempers as crushed shell and limestone. Decoration embellished several forms and included rouletting and applied strips on kitchen wares and white slip and applied pads on jugs. Forms included cooking pots, bowls, shallow dishes, cisterns, curfews and building materials....

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Article

Michael R. McCarthy

English town in the county of Warwickshire. Named after a 12th-century Benedictine nunnery that was founded at Eaton. The abbey, like so many other buildings, fell into disrepair in the Reformation when the church was converted into a private residence. Very little survives today of the original building apart from a tiled floor, the crossing piers, and some low walls; these are incorporated in the parish church of St Mary the Virgin (the Abbey Church), which is largely a 19th-century recreation (with some later 20th-century extensions)....

Article

Sanage  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan. It flourished from the 5th to the 16th century. The large complex of kilns is clustered around Mt Sanage near Nagoya (Aichi Prefect.). Sanage wares are understood, through extensive archaeological research carried out from the mid-1950s, to have been the earliest glazed ...

Article

Seto  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan, near Nagoya (Aichi Prefect.). The area occupies an important place in Japanese ceramic history, because, together with neighbouring Mino, it was the only ceramics centre to produce glazed ware before the Momoyama period (1568–1600). Its importance as a producer of utilitarian wares in the early modern period is reflected in the word ...

Article

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese centre of ceramics production, in the foothills flanking the Daido River valley in south-west Ōmi Province (now Shiga Prefect.). Together with Seto, Echizen, Tanba, Bizen and Tokoname, Shigaraki is one of Japan’s oldest continuously functioning traditional pottery centres (see Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)...

Article

Walter Spiegl

German centre of ceramics production. From the late 14th century a greyish-white, salt-glazed stoneware was produced in Siegburg in the Rhineland. Among the earliest Siegburg wares were Jakobakannen (tall, slender jugs with ring handles at the neck), which were only sometimes decorated with incised or relief motifs. Other products included ...

Article

Tanba  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of Japanese ceramics production based in and around Tachikui and Kamaya villages (Hyōgo Prefect.). Together with Bizen, Shigaraki, Echizen, Seto and Tokoname, Tanba is one of the few Japanese kiln centres that has been active from the 12th century to the present day. The origins of Tanba ware are not perfectly understood, but recent excavations of the ...

Article

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in western Chita (Aichi Prefect.), Japan. Tokoname, together with other important centres such as Bizen, Shigaraki, Seto, Tanba and Echizen, is famous for its continuous production to the present day (see Japan, §IX, 3, (ii)). The origins of the ware can be traced back to the 12th century, when increased agricultural development encouraged the spread of high-fired ceramics techniques from the central ...

Article

Italian, 14th – 15th century, male.

Active in Florence.

Glass painter, potter.

Benedetto Ubriachi was the son of Baldassare Ubriachi. He studied in Venice.

Article

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