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Article

Flemish School, 17th century, male.

Born 1587, in Antwerp; died 30 October 1661.

Painter, painter (glass/ceramics), engraver. Animals, flowers, fruit, still-lifes.

Alexander Adriaenssen was a pupil of A. van Laeck and a member of the Antwerp guild in 1610. He was a fine painter of flowers, birds and fish and also painted on glass and pottery, excelling at producing silver tones. A copperplate engraving by him of A. van der Does, after van Dyck, is extant....

Article

Agano  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese region in Buzen Province (now part of Fukuoka Prefect.), northern Kyushu, where stonewares were manufactured at various sites from c. 1600 (see also Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)).

The first potter to make Agano ware was the Korean master Chon’gye (Jap. Sonkai; ...

Article

Luciana Arbace

Italian centre of ceramic production. The town, situated near Savona in Liguria, was a flourishing centre of maiolica production during the Renaissance. It was, however, only during the 17th and 18th centuries that a distinctive style developed. Important families in the pottery business included the ...

Article

Portuguese, 17th century, female.

Born c. 1640.

Sculptor.

Daughter of the painter Luiz da Costa, Ignacia Almeida worked in wax and clay. A clay group representing The Death of the Blessed Virgin, in the church of St Roque in Lisbon, was attributed to her.

Article

Italian, 17th century, male.

Active in Urbino.

Painter, sculptor, potter.

Amantini studied in his native Urbino with Varsajo Bartoccini and subsequently lived in the home of Frederigo Gioja in San Sepolcro. In 1642, his brothers prevailed upon him to give up painting and open a pottery in Urbino. After the death of his father that same year, he gave up pottery to concentrate exclusively on painting. In ...

Article

Arita  

Hiroko Nishida

Region in Japan, now part of Saga Prefecture, and the name of a type of porcelain first produced there during the early Edo period (1600–1868). The ware was originally known as Imari yaki (‘Imari ware’) because it was shipped from the port of Imari (Saga Prefect.). During the Meiji period (...

Article

Italian, 16th – 17th century, male.

Active in Reggio.

Sculptor.

In 1573, Vincenzo Bagnoli executed a life-size clay statue of a certain Graziano for the monks of S Procolo in Bologna. In 1584 he worked at Ferrara Cathedral and in 1604 at the Rosario church in Amandola....

Article

Portuguese painter of Spanish origin. He arrived in Lisbon in 1669 and began his career as a decorative painter in the workshop milieu of the city. In the same year he married Agostina das Neves, the sister-in-law of the painter Marcos da Cruz. In 1681–2...

Article

Portuguese, 17th century, male.

Activec.1691-1699.

Potter. Religious subjects. Church decoration.

The chapel in the country house of the Cordes Family near the church of Barcarena was adorned with blue tiles by Gabriel del Barco. (The use of decorative tiles - Azulejos- was a very widespread technique for both the interior and exterior decoration of churches and public monuments in Portugal in the 17th and 18th centuries.) Barco's tiles portrayed the ...

Article

Italian, 17th century, male.

Painter, potter.

Lived in Urbania and was Tommaso Amantini's best pupil. He turned to painting when the public at large began to show a declining interest in ceramics. Some of his work is today on view in Ferro and Cagli.

Article

Gordon Campbell

Western name for Chinese porcelain of the Kangxi period (1662–1722) imported by Dutch merchants through the Dutch trading station at Batavia (now Jakarta). This porcelain, which was brown-glazed, decorated with panels and usually painted in blue, was imitated by European manufacturers, notably at Meissen and Leeds, and these imitations are known as Batavia ware....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Italian engraver, designer, painter and architect, active in Aquila. He worked as a designer of maiolica for Carlantonio Grue, and published sets of engraved ornaments.

H. Coutts: ‘Francesco Bedeschini Designer of Maiolica’ Apollo, 6 (1987), pp. 401–3

Article

Gordon Campbell

Type of German glazed stoneware jug produced from the 15th century through to the 19th, and known in English from the 17th century as the bellarmine, the eponym of which was Cardinal Roberto Bellarmino (1542–1621), who was detested in England because of his anti-Protestant polemics. The jugs, which are decorated with the moulded face of a bearded man (sometimes with a coat-of-arms below it) are also known as ‘Greybeards’ and as ‘d’Alva bottles’; the latter name alludes to the third Duke of Alba (...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Died 1686 (?).

Sculptor (terracotta).

He worked in Le Mans and his name appears in the archives from 1658 to 1686.

Soulgé-sur-Ouette (Church St-Médard): St Medard (third quarter of XVIIe century)

Bresc-Bautier, Geneviève/Le Boeuf, François...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born 4 November 1608, in Le Mans; died 1671, in Angers.

Sculptor (terracotta), architect. Religious subjects, figures. Statues, groups.

Pierre Biardeau was the son of René II Biardeau. He went to live in Angers in 1638. He was in Luçon in ...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Active in Le Mans.

Born 1606; died 1651.

Sculptor (terracotta). Religious subjects, figures. Groups.

This artist was the son of René Biardeau, and the brother of Pierre Biardeau. He worked on the gates of Le Mans in about 1638, and one of the ...

Article

Bizen  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese centre of ceramics production. High-fired ceramic wares were manufactured from the end of the 12th century in and around the village of Inbe, Bizen Province (now Okayama Prefect.). This region had been a centre for manufacturing Sue-style stonewares and Haji-style earthenwares from the 6th century ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Large circular earthenware dish made in England (especially Bristol and Lambeth) in the late 17th century and early 18th; the name derives from the dashes of blue around the rims. The dishes are usually decorated with portraits of Stuart monarchs or pretenders, but some portray an Adam and Eve in which the fruit is an orange, an allusion to William and Mary of Orange. There are no makers’ marks on the dishes....

Article

Boccaro  

Gordon Campbell

Scented red earthenware brought originally by the Portuguese from Mexico; the word derives from Portuguese búcaro (clay cup). The term also denotes similar earthenware made in Portugal and Spain (especially Talavera) from the 16th to the 18th centuries, and the imitation made by Johann Friedrich Böttger...

Article

Dutch, 17th – 18th century, male.

Active in Delft.

Baptised 10 August 1670; died 8 October 1736.

Potter.