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Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 20 April 1900, in Chatillon-Coligny (Loiret); died, Jacques died in 1984.

Painters, sculptors (including bronze/ceramics), decorative designers. Landscapes, figures, animals.

The Adnet twins exhibited together at the Salon des Artistes Français, winning a joint travel scholarship in 1927. They were members of the Salon d'Automne and also exhibited at the Salons des Indépendants and Salon des Tuileries. Their submissions of paintings have largely been of landscapes, but they have also offered paintings of furniture. Their careers later led them into the decorative arts; Jacques created the ...

Article

Amasis  

6th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Ionia.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

Attic School.

The signature Amasis made this ( Amasis epoiesen), may mean that Amasis was not the artist who painted these vases, but the potter. Three amphorae, four oenochoes (wine jugs) and the remains of a kylix (drinking vessel) exist by this artist. The subjects are taken from Homer, the legend of Heracles, and the myth of Perseus and the Gorgon. The figures in his pottery are black-figure Attic in style, standing out clearly against a plain background. Their clothes are decorated with incised and often geometric detail. The artist has highlighted the clothes with a purplish red and the flesh of the women with white....

Article

Anacles  

6th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

Working in the Attic black-figure style, Anacles' signature appears coupled with that of Nicosthenes.

Article

6th century, male.

Active at the end of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter.

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

Credited with inventing red-figure ceramic painting, Andocides produced both red- and black-figure vases. The clothes of his figures are ornamented, while his naked figures are decorative, with the muscles indicated by geometric patterns....

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Born in S Angelo de Vado.

Painter, stucco artist, potter. Wall decorations.

Agostino Appolloni studied painting at the studio of his uncle Lucio Dolce, who made him his heir. Appolloni then founded a pottery at Castel-Durante. In 1585 he executed mural paintings and stucco work for the church of S Francesco in Castel-Durante....

Article

6th century, male.

Active in Attica in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

The signature of Archicles sometimes appears alongside that of Glaucytes. Little of his own work remains.

Article

7th century, male.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

Aristonothus' signature appears on a krater from Caere.

Rome (Palazzo dei Conservatori): krater

Article

5th century, male.

Vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

Born in Attica in the late 5th century BC, Aristophanes, painting in the 'rich' style, signed a number of cups made by the potter Erginus.

Vatican (Vatican): krater

Article

Suzanne Tise

Descriptive term applied to a style of decorative arts that was widely disseminated in Europe and the USA during the 1920s and 1930s. Derived from the style made popular by the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes held in Paris in 1925, the term has been used only since the late 1960s, when there was a revival of interest in the decorative arts of the early 20th century. Since then the term ‘Art Deco’ has been applied to a wide variety of works produced during the inter-war years, and even to those of the German Bauhaus. But Art Deco was essentially of French origin, and the term should, therefore, be applied only to French works and those from countries directly influenced by France....

Article

Michèle Lavallée

Decorative style of the late 19th century and the early 20th that flourished principally in Europe and the USA. Although it influenced painting and sculpture, its chief manifestations were in architecture and the decorative and graphic arts, the aspects on which this survey concentrates. It is characterized by sinuous, asymmetrical lines based on organic forms; in a broader sense it encompasses the geometrical and more abstract patterns and rhythms that were evolved as part of the general reaction to 19th-century historicism. There are wide variations in the style according to where it appeared and the materials that were employed....

Article

Spanish, 20th century, male.

Active in France.

Born 1892, in Barcelona; died 11 December 1980, in Barcelona.

Sculptor, potter, enameller (ceramics).

Josep Artigas, educated at the Escuela de Artes y Oficios in Barcelona, wrote a treatise on Ancient Egyptian enamel. Although he showed his own ceramic sculptures, he collaborated with Braque, Dufy and (above all) his friend Miró in their pottery, and as an individual he was overshadowed by them. It is true that Joan Miró emphasized the part Artigas played in the creation of his works, declaring them to be the result of a genuine collaboration, but Braque and Dufy claimed most of the credit for themselves....

Article

Alan Crawford

Informal movement in architecture and the decorative arts that championed the unity of the arts, the experience of the individual craftsman, and the qualities of materials and construction in the work itself.

The Arts and Crafts Movement developed in the second half of the 19th century and lasted well into the 20th, drawing its support from progressive artists, architects and designers, philanthropists, amateurs, and middle-class women seeking work in the home. They set up small workshops apart from the world of industry, revived old techniques, and revered the humble household objects of pre-industrial times. The movement was strongest in the industrializing countries of northern Europe and in the USA, and it can best be understood as an unfocused reaction against industrialization. Although quixotic in its anti-industrialism, it was not unique; indeed it was only one among several late 19th-century reform movements, such as the Garden City movement, vegetarianism, and folksong revivals, that set the Romantic values of nature and folk culture against the artificiality of modern life....

Article

French, male.

Born 25 December 1795, in Tours, Or in 1796 according to some sources; died 6 February 1861, in Tours.

Potter. Bestiaries. Decorative schemes, church decoration, busts.

School of Tours.

Avisseau was the son of Charles Avisseau, a stone-cutter and later a potter and a 'firer of earthenware'. Charles-Jean Avisseau began his career working for his father as a stone-cutter. He then studied at the École Académique de Dessin (academy of drawing) in Tours, and later became an apprentice in an earthenware factory in St-Pierre-des-Corps. He had already become a respected colourist by ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1831, in Tours; died 1911, in Tours.

Potter, enameller. Religious furnishings.

School of Tours.

The son of Charles-Jean Avisseau, and uncle to Édouard-Léon, Joseph-Édouard Avisseau was a pupil of his father, and also studied drawing and painting in Lobin's studio. He worked in close collaboration with his father, and shared his taste for the historicist Renaissance movement, veering progressively towards the Baroque. With his father and his sister Caroline, he executed ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Ornamental motif (derived from Strapwork) of interlaced bands, used in early 18th-century Germany on furniture, metalwork and pottery.

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born in Perpignan.

Decorative designer, enameller, ceramicist.

Pierre Bardou exhibited his enamel and ceramic works in Paris between 1919 and 1926 at the Salon d'Automne.

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1 June 1873, in Chicago; died 1953, in Beverly (Massachusetts).

Painter, decorative designer.

Frederick Clay Bartlett studied in Munich and in Paris in the studios of Louis Joseph Collin and Aman-Jean. He took classes with Whistler at his short-lived Paris school before returning to Chicago in ...

Article

Gabriele Ramsauer

She studied at the Österreichische Bundeslehranstalt für das Baufach und Kunstgewerbe in Graz from 1922 until 1926, where she attended the sculpture classes of Wilhelm Gösser and the ceramic classes of Hans Adametz. In 1926 she became an assistant in the ceramic design section of the ...

Article

Bauhaus  

Rainer K. Wick

German school of art, design and architecture, founded by Walter Gropius. It was active in Weimar from 1919 to 1925, in Dessau from 1925 to 1932 and in Berlin from 1932 to 1933, when it was closed down by the Nazi authorities. The Bauhaus’s name referred to the medieval Bauhütten or ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 14 April 1868, in Hamburg; died 27 February 1940, in Berlin.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, architect, designer, decorative artist, graphic designer. Posters, furniture, wallpaper, carpets, glassware, ceramics, table services, jewellery, silverwork, objets d'art, typefaces.

Jugendstil, functional school.

Die Sieben (Group of Seven), Deutscher Werkbund...