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Article

Christine Mullen Kreamer

Togolese painter, sculptor, engraver, stained glass designer, potter and textile designer. Beginning in 1946, he received his secondary education in Dakar, where he also worked in an architecture firm. He travelled to France and received his diplôme supérieur from the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris. A versatile artist, Ahyi is best known for his murals and for monumental stone, marble and cement public sculptures. His work reflects the fusion of his Togolese roots, European training and an international outlook, and he counts among his influences Moore, Braque, Modigliani, Tamayo, Siqueiros and Tall. His work combines ancient and modern themes and materials, maternity being a prominent topic. The messages of his larger, public pieces operate on a broad level to appeal to the general populace, while smaller works often reflect his private engagement with challenges confronting the human condition. His compositions are both abstract and figurative and evoke the heroism and hope of the two world wars, Togo's colonial period and the struggle for independence from France, as well as the political efforts of the peoples of Vietnam, South Africa and Palestine. Ahyi has won numerous international prizes, including the prize of the city of Lyon (...

Article

Alzata  

Gordon Campbell

Type of Italian plate, mounted on a high thin stem, often for use as a centrepiece or fruit bowl; sometimes a series of plates and stems is mounted on top of each other. The plates are usually made of glass or pottery.

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 17 March 1885, in La Ferté-Vidame (Eure-et-Loir); died 1953.

Painter, ceramicist, glassmaker.

Art Nouveau.

Gabriel Argy-Rousseau studied at the school of ceramics in Sèvres. He participated in the Salon d'Automne between 1920 and 1924, and exhibited glassware and enamel work at the Salon des Artistes Français in ...

Article

Suzanne Tise

Descriptive term applied to a style of decorative arts that was widely disseminated in Europe and the USA during the 1920s and 1930s. Derived from the style made popular by the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes held in Paris in 1925, the term has been used only since the late 1960s, when there was a revival of interest in the decorative arts of the early 20th century. Since then the term ‘Art Deco’ has been applied to a wide variety of works produced during the inter-war years, and even to those of the German Bauhaus. But Art Deco was essentially of French origin, and the term should, therefore, be applied only to French works and those from countries directly influenced by France....

Article

Michèle Lavallée

Decorative style of the late 19th century and the early 20th that flourished principally in Europe and the USA. Although it influenced painting and sculpture, its chief manifestations were in architecture and the decorative and graphic arts, the aspects on which this survey concentrates. It is characterized by sinuous, asymmetrical lines based on organic forms; in a broader sense it encompasses the geometrical and more abstract patterns and rhythms that were evolved as part of the general reaction to 19th-century historicism. There are wide variations in the style according to where it appeared and the materials that were employed....

Article

Alan Crawford

Informal movement in architecture and the decorative arts that championed the unity of the arts, the experience of the individual craftsman, and the qualities of materials and construction in the work itself.

The Arts and Crafts Movement developed in the second half of the 19th century and lasted well into the 20th, drawing its support from progressive artists, architects and designers, philanthropists, amateurs, and middle-class women seeking work in the home. They set up small workshops apart from the world of industry, revived old techniques, and revered the humble household objects of pre-industrial times. The movement was strongest in the industrializing countries of northern Europe and in the USA, and it can best be understood as an unfocused reaction against industrialization. Although quixotic in its anti-industrialism, it was not unique; indeed it was only one among several late 19th-century reform movements, such as the Garden City movement, vegetarianism, and folksong revivals, that set the Romantic values of nature and folk culture against the artificiality of modern life....

Article

Gordon Campbell

American potter and sculptor of Finnish descent who is best known as a figurative ceramicist but has also worked in bronze, concrete, glass and metal. His works are normally in stoneware with incised decorations, but Autio began to work in porcelain while working at the ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 14 April 1868, in Hamburg; died 27 February 1940, in Berlin.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, architect, designer, decorative artist, graphic designer. Posters, furniture, wallpaper, carpets, glassware, ceramics, table services, jewellery, silverwork, objets d'art, typefaces.

Jugendstil, functional school.

Die Sieben (Group of Seven), Deutscher Werkbund...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 19 May 1785, in Paris; died 21 April 1867, in Sèvres (Hauts-de-Seine).

Painter (including porcelain), glassmaker. Genre scenes, still-lifes.

Exhibited on a regular basis at Paris Salons between 1814 and 1859. Active at the Sèvres Porcelain Factory and designed stained glass cartoons for the Dreux and Trianon chapels. His subjects often have a moralising undertone which is reflected in their titles - ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

English porcelain painter and designer, was born near Kidderminster, Worcestershire, the son of a maker of spade handles. He was trained from 1846 as a glass painter at Richardson’s glassworks at Wordsley near Stourbridge. In 1853 he moved to Worcester to work as a painter for the Worcester Porcelain Factory, where he developed ‘Worcester enamel’, a tinted white enamel on a dark ground (often blue); the resemblance to 16th-century Limoges enamels led to his work being sold as ‘Limoges ware’....

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 25 October 1876, in Paris.

Glass painter, potter.

Georges Bourgeot studied under Grasset and exhibited at the Salon of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts in Paris.

Article

Claudine Stensgaard Nielsen

Danish painter, glass designer and ceramicist. He trained as a stonemason and then studied sculpture in Copenhagen at the Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi (1877–81), where he decided to become a painter. In 1884 he changed his name from Andersen to Brendekilde after his place of birth, as he was constantly being confused with his friend ...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 14 December 1886, in Saintes; died 1986.

Painter (gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman, decorative designer, sculptor, ceramicist. Scenes with figures, nudes, portraits, still-lifes, landscapes, animals. Designs for stained glass.

Japonisme, Art Deco.

School of Bordeaux.

René Buthaud worked first of all in Bordeaux under François Quinsac and then, ...

Article

Italian, 20th century, male.

Born 1876; died 1960.

Sculptor, illustrator, decorative artist, potter, glassmaker, watercolourist, draughtsman.

Cambellotti's work was shown in the exhibitions Roman Secession, 1913-1916, held in Rome in 1987, and From Glass to Diamond: Artistic Stained Glass in Rome 1912-1925 at the Exhibition Centre in Rome in ...

Article

French, 20th century, female.

Born 30 September 1932, in Paris.

Painter, lithographer, illustrator, pastellist, watercolourist, potter. Figures, portraits, genre scenes, landscapes, urban landscapes, still-lifes. Murals, designs for tapestries, stained glass windows.

Nathalie Chabrier studied at the École des Arts Appliqués and the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. She married Roger Forissier. She has worked mostly in decorative arts, notably in stained glass windows, tapestry, ceramics and murals. She has received various prizes, including the state art prize in ...

Article

Russian, 20th century, male.

Active naturalised in France from 1937.

Born 7 July 1887, in Vitebsk; died 28 March 1985, in St-Paul-de-Vence, France.

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, sculptor, ceramicist, engraver, decorative artist, illustrator. Religious subjects, portraits, genre scenes, landscapes, landscapes with figures. Murals, designs for stained glass, designs for mosaics, low reliefs...

Article

Belgian, 20th century, male.

Born 1902, in Louvain.

Painter, potter. Designs for stained glass.

Constant Charlier's work can be seen in Louvain, where he made the windows for the cathedral of St Peter, the town hall and the university library.

Article

Gordon Campbell

German designer. After an early career as an interior designer he turned to the design of tapestries (subsequently woven at the Scherbeker Kunstgewerbeschule), porcelain (table wares), drinking glasses (for the Theresienthaler Kristallglasfabrik) and silver cutlery. After 1914 he worked primarily as a painter and writer....

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 15 June 1879, in Paris; died 26 April 1963, in Montmorency.

Painter, potter, designer. Mythological and religious subjects, portraits, nudes, landscapes, urban landscapes, still-lifes. Wall decorations, designs for stained glass.

Georges-Louis Claude was educated at the Bernard Palissy college of design in Paris and went on to teach decorative painting at the school of applied arts there (now the École Supérieure des Arts Appliqués Olivier de Serres), where his students included the future master painter-on-glass Paul Bony and the poster artist Hervé Morvan....

Article

Cobalt  

Gordon Campbell

Blue pigment derived from cobalt ore, used as a colourant for ceramics and glass since antiquity, and in medieval Europe used to colour stained glass.