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Article

Italian, 20th century, male.

Born 1900, in Marciana Marina (Livorno); died 1971, in Milan.

Painter, ceramicist, illustrator, scenographer, writer. Stage costumes.

Futurism.

Giovanni Acquaviva studied philosophy and law at the University of Pisa, while devoting himself to illustration at the same time. He founded the Futurist group ...

Article

Italian, 20th century, male.

Born 2 December 1899, in Albisola; died May 1971, in Albisola.

Ceramicist, draughtsman, painter, sculptor, screen printer, photographer. Artists' books.

Futurism.

Tullio d'Albisola studied with his father Giuseppe, a master potter, then with Gaetano Ballardini at the international university pottery class in Faenza, which he entered in ...

Article

Michèle Lavallée

Decorative style of the late 19th century and the early 20th that flourished principally in Europe and the USA. Although it influenced painting and sculpture, its chief manifestations were in architecture and the decorative and graphic arts, the aspects on which this survey concentrates. It is characterized by sinuous, asymmetrical lines based on organic forms; in a broader sense it encompasses the geometrical and more abstract patterns and rhythms that were evolved as part of the general reaction to 19th-century historicism. There are wide variations in the style according to where it appeared and the materials that were employed....

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 2 February 1914, in Washington (North Carolina), 1919, according to some sources; died 1977.

Sculptor, print artist, ceramicist, illustrator.

William E. Artis studied at the University of Syracuse, New York, New York State University and the Art Students League, New York. He was also a student of Augusta Savage at the Harlem Community Art Center, New York. Artis expressed his humanist ideals by depicting impassive faces in a purified style, combining African and classical sculpture....

Article

Alan Crawford

Informal movement in architecture and the decorative arts that championed the unity of the arts, the experience of the individual craftsman, and the qualities of materials and construction in the work itself.

The Arts and Crafts Movement developed in the second half of the 19th century and lasted well into the 20th, drawing its support from progressive artists, architects and designers, philanthropists, amateurs, and middle-class women seeking work in the home. They set up small workshops apart from the world of industry, revived old techniques, and revered the humble household objects of pre-industrial times. The movement was strongest in the industrializing countries of northern Europe and in the USA, and it can best be understood as an unfocused reaction against industrialization. Although quixotic in its anti-industrialism, it was not unique; indeed it was only one among several late 19th-century reform movements, such as the Garden City movement, vegetarianism, and folksong revivals, that set the Romantic values of nature and folk culture against the artificiality of modern life....

Article

Iraqi, 20th century, male.

Active in England since 1976.

Born 1939, in Baghdad.

Painter, potter, illustrator. Designs for tapes­tries.

Dhia Azzaoui initially studied archaeology. He then went on to study at Baghdad’s school of fine art. He has lived and worked in London since 1976...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 14 July 1821, in Montreuil-sur-Mer; died after 1901.

Painter (including porcelain), draughtsman, illustrator, engraver. Landscapes.

Initially a porcelain painter like Diaz and Troyon, the 20-year-old Alexandre de Bar came to the attention of Alexis de Fontenay who took him under his wing. By the following year, he had given up ceramics to devote himself exclusively to painting. He exhibited regularly from 1845 to 1870, chiefly landscapes. In 1856, he travelled to Egypt to document an expedition to chart the source of the Nile and remained there for a full year. De Bar occupies a major position among the illustrators of the Second Empire and was a major contributor to leading publications such as ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 13 September 1822, in Paris; died 25 January 1907, in Paris.

Painter, illustrator. History painting, portraits, genre scenes. Murals.

Son of the porcelain painter and miniaturist Barrias, Félix Joseph Barrias studied at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris under L. Cogniet and exhibited regularly at the Paris Salon from ...

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Born 14 March 1814, in Erfurt; died 11 August 1889, in Berlin.

Painter, fresco artist, illustrator. Landscapes.

Bellermann began his studies at the art school in Weimar, learning porcelain painting under Johann Heinrich Meyer (1828). On 16 March 1833...

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 15 April 1889, in Neosho (Missouri); died 1975, in Kansas City (Missouri).

Painter, lithographer, illustrator, ceramicist. Scenes with figures, genre scenes, local scenes. Murals.

American Regionalism.

Thomas Hart Benton gave up his job as a newspaper cartoonist in order to enroll in the Art Institute of Chicago, before pursuing his studies in Paris at the Académie Julian from 1908 to 1911. He was then in contact with some of the early 20th-century artists seeking radical renewal, in particular Stanton MacDonald-Wright, one of the active members of the Synchromism movement, which used the circle as the element capable of enlivening an abstract composition through the effects of colour dynamism. Benton himself said that it took him 10 years to break away from this abstract art, which later, after World War I, he openly opposed. But on his return to the USA in 1912, he was still in touch with Alfred Stieglitz, who was showing work by abstract artists and in 1916 was still showing Benton’s synchromist abstract paintings. Back in New York in 1913, he produced pottery, designed sets for Fox Studios, illustrated books and taught an evening class. He also taught at the New School for Social Research in Manhattan, where his personal choices had a significant influence on a great many young artists. Then, from 1926, he taught at the Art Students League, New York, where in 1929 one of his students was Jackson Pollock, who for a time painted Realist pictures, but quickly reacted against this genre, all the more vigorously for having to oppose Benton’s strong personality....