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Article

Swiss, 19th century, male.

Born 24 September 1800, in Winterthur; died 19 December 1872, in Winterthur.

Engraver, sculptor, medallist.

Son and pupil of the engraver Johann Aberli. His name crops up in Lyons in 1821 and Paris in 1823. Around 1825 to 1828 he worked in Winterthur. From ...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Born 21 April 1821, in Staines; died 4 March 1898, in Chiswick.

Sculptor, medallist.

George Adams studied at the Royal Mint under William Wyon and made his name with a sculpture based on a miniature of Queen Victoria. Adams then embarked on a major series of works, including eight portrait statues in Trafalgar Square....

Article

Hannelore Hägele

German sculptor. After an apprenticeship as a metal worker, having spent seven years as a journeyman in a silver-plating factory and having taught himself drawing and sculpting, he received a scholarship that allowed him to attend art school. In 1840 he met Christian Daniel Rauch who invited him to Berlin as his pupil, and there he was influenced by the prevalent Neo-classical style. However, his early works, such as the colossal figure of ...

Article

Polish, 19th – 20th century, female.

Active in France.

Born in Lopatynka.

Sculptor, medallist. Busts.

A student of Falguière and of the medal engraver Daniel Dupuis, Iza Albazzi exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Français in Paris from 1896 to 1923 and was honoured for medal engraving in ...

Article

‛Ali  

S. J. Vernoit

Persian enamel painter. All of his work is associated with the patronage of the Qajar monarch Fath ‛Ali Shah (reg 1797–1834). ‛Ali signed his work with the title ghulām khānazād (‘slave born in the household’) signifying ‘artist in the royal service’. A jewelled nephrite dish (Vienna, Ksthist. Mus., Samml. Plastik & Kstgew., M3223) presented in ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1874, in Hanau; died 1913, in Berlin.

Sculptor, worker in precious metals. Figures. Designs (ceramics/metal objects).

Jugendstil.

Adolf Amberg trained at the academy of fine arts in Berlin. He went to Paris and worked at the Académie Julian, exhibiting at the Salon of ...

Article

Freya Probst

German silversmith, sculptor and painter. He attended the Zeichenakademie and the Kunstgewerbeschule in Hanau then studied at the Kunstgewerbeschule, Berlin, and the Académie Julian in Paris, before finally becoming a student of the sculptor Louis Tuaillon at the Kunstakademie, Berlin. From 1894 to 1903 he worked at the renowned silverware factory of ...

Article

Canadian metalworker. He studied at the Petit Seminaire du Québec from 1778 to 1780 and began his apprenticeship c. 1780 in the silversmith’s shop of his elder brother, Jean-Nicolas Amiot (1750–1821); the tradition that he was apprenticed to François Ranvoyzé is unfounded. In ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Norwegian silversmith. Founder of the Oslo company of silversmiths now known as David-Andersen. In 1876 Andersen established a workshop and retail shop in Christiania (Oslo). His early work, mostly in 830 silver, uses traditional Nordic motifs. David’s son Arthur (1875–1970), who became the principal designer for the firm and inherited it in ...

Article

Mark Jones

French medallist, engraver and illustrator. He was first apprenticed to the medallist André Lavau (d 1808) and then attended the Académie de Peinture et de Sculpture in Bordeaux. In 1786 he travelled to Paris and entered the workshop of Nicolas-Marie Gatteaux. His first great success was a large, realistic and highly detailed medal representing the ...