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Mary M. Tinti

American sculptor, installation and conceptual artist. His multimedia works investigate the pathology of contemporary culture. Mel Chin was born and raised in Houston, Texas to parents of Chinese birth and received his BA in 1975 from the Peabody College in Nashville, Tennessee. The works in Chin’s oeuvre are diverse in both medium and subject, but a consistent undercurrent of social, political, and environmental responsibility runs throughout. Whether a sculpture, film, video game, installation, public project or earthwork, Chin’s artworks consistently targeted a broad spectrum of pressing cultural and ecological interests and spread their message in subtle, if not viral ways....

Article

Japanese, 20th century, male.

Active in Italy from 1967.

Born 1940, in Tonei (Manchuria).

Sculptor, painter, environmental artist.

Nagasawa Hidetoshi studied at the Tama fine arts school in Tokyo. He subsequently went to Europe and settled in Milan, where he worked with Fabro, an artist of the Arte Povera movement....

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Japanese, 20th century, male.

Born 28 January 1927, in Tokyo; died 14 April 2001, in Tokyo.

Sculptor, environmental artist, film maker, flower arranger.

Teshigahara Hiroshi was caught up in 1960s international art but also attached to Japanese tradition: he would invite Rauschenberg and Cage to Tokyo while teaching the art of flower arrangement at the Ikebana School. He created avant-garde environments but used natural components fully in the spirit of Japanese tradition, such as green bamboo....

Article

Midori Yoshimoto

Japanese sculptor, installation and video artist . Torimitsu received a BFA in sculpture at Tama Art University (1994) and, soon after her university graduation, she completed Miyata Jiro, a life-size robot of a stereotypical Japanese businessman, and made it crawl on the pavements of various districts in Tokyo. Perhaps because of its candid critique of Japanese corporate culture, businessmen in Marunouchi district pretended not to look at the robot, while it attracted large crowds elsewhere. In order to study varying reactions to her robot in different social settings, Torimitsu moved to New York in ...