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Canadian First Nations (Oji-Cree), 20th century, female.

Born 28 March 1971, in Yorkton (Saskatchewan).

Installation artist, ceramicist, photographer, sculptor, printmaker.

KC Adams studied at Concordia University, in Montreal, Quebec, where she received her BFA in Studio Arts in 1998. Her artistic practice was further developed through artists’ residencies in Canada, at institutions in Banff, Charlottetown and Winnipeg. During her ...

Article

Native American (Wiyot and Yurok), 20th–21st century, male.

Born 1946, in Newport (Oregon).

Sculptor, painter, ceramicist, mixed-media artist, print-maker.

Rick Bartow of the Wiyot and Yurok Nations of Northern California works in a number of media to create images which often reference indigenous North American transformation myths. His work with the Maori artist John Bevan Ford has also been an influence. In ...

Article

Canadian First Nations (Ojibwa), 20th–21st century, male.

Born 1942 or 1943, in M’chigeeng (West Bay), Manitoulin Island. Died 2005, Ottawa.

Draughtsman, painter, ceramicist, installation artist.

Carl Beam, a distinguished Ojibwa artist, was the first Canadian indigenous artist to gain recognition for contemporary Native American art by having one of his pieces accepted into the National Gallery of Art (Ottawa). He achieved a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Victoria, and ...

Article

Margaret Moore Booker

Native American potter. The daughter of famed Navajo potter Rose Williams, Cling broke with tradition by creating highly polished, red-hued decorative ware in a contemporary style that ushered in a new generation of Navajo art potters (including her two sisters).

After graduating from the Intermountain Indian School in Brigham City, UT, she married Jerry Cling and worked as a teacher’s aide at the Shonto Boarding School. Initially learning to pot from her mother while a young girl, she became interested in the craft in the 1970s and over time developed an innovative style that reflected her own individual vision....

Article

G. Lola Worthington

Native American (Cochiti) potter. Best known as inventor of the “Cochiti Pueblo Storyteller figure,” Cordero is credited with innovation and regarded as a true folk artist. Unable to master traditional pottery forms such as bowls and vases, she produced other craftworks, such as leather and beadwork for sale, later turning to pottery as an alternative income source. Dissatisfied and frustrated with her clay skills, her cousin suggested she try to create figures. She recalled it was “like a flower blooming.”...

Article

Frederick J. Dockstader

Native American Pueblo potter of San Ildefonso, NM. She attended the Institute of American Indian Art in Santa Fe. She married Robert Gonzales (1920) and moved to his home in San Ildefonso, where they had two children: Marie and Tsé-Pe, the latter also a potter. Gonzales was not a potter in her youth, but learnt the art from her mother-in-law, ...

Article

Native American (Cherokee), 20th–21st century, male.

Born in Oklahoma.

Ceramicist, sculptor.

A member of the Cherokee Nation, Troy Jackson is a noted potter and sculptor in clay who is also a native Oklahoman. He received his Associate of Arts from Bacone College in Muskogee (where he now teaches as an Adjunct Professor of Art) and his Bachelor of Arts from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. He later completed the MFA programme at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He has worked in a number of media, including painting and drawing, but has become known particularly for his expertly rendered figures in clay modelled in a naturalistic style but showing the artist’s links with his Cherokee ancestors who have a long cultural tradition of working in clay. Creating his vessels both on the wheel and by hand, he manages to drawn attention to Southeastern indigenous people and their experiences as well as combining these with influences found in European art traditions....

Article

Native American (Seneca and Onondaga Nations), 20th–21st century, male.

Born 8 June 1947, on Cattaraugus Indian Reservation (New York).

Sculptor, ceramicist, installation artist.

Peter B. Jones was born and raised on the Seneca Indian Reservation at Cattaraugus, New York, where his father’s family lives. He is also descended from the Onondaga Nation on his mother’s side. His work in ceramics has become widely collected and is shown in major exhibitions in North America and abroad. In ...

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Barbara Kramer

Native American potter. As a child she made and sold Acoma polychrome pottery, which by 1900 had deteriorated into tourist wares such as vases and ashtrays, but in the 1930s she began working in the Acoma pottery tradition of the 19th century, making jars with a red-slip base and white-slip body that were decorated with the bird and flower motifs that had been common from ...

Article

G. Lola Worthington

Native American (Santa Clara Pueblo) potter. A renowned potter and member of the Tafoya family, his father, Camilio Sunflower Tafoya, revived ancestral traditional pottery forms and techniques and his sister, Grace Medicine Flower, was also a successful potter. Camilio produced Santa Clara’s first carved black and brick red pots characteristic of Mimbres pottery. Of his Pueblo upbringing, LoneWolf recalled, “We’d sit in the evenings and do beadwork, drawing, painting, clay modeling, woodworking, costume repairing … while our grandparents told us the old legend and stories.”...