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Article

Agano  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese region in Buzen Province (now part of Fukuoka Prefect.), northern Kyushu, where stonewares were manufactured at various sites from c. 1600 (see also Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)).

The first potter to make Agano ware was the Korean master Chon’gye (Jap. Sonkai; ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

French pottery manufactory in Le Castellet, near Apt (about 65 km north of Marseille) established in 1723 by César Moulin, who produced a distinctive marbled yellow-glazed pottery; the designs are modelled on English pottery (perhaps Wedgwood), and look more English than French. The success of this pottery encouraged others to open in and around Apt, which is still an important pottery centre....

Article

Bizen  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese centre of ceramics production. High-fired ceramic wares were manufactured from the end of the 12th century in and around the village of Inbe, Bizen Province (now Okayama Prefect.). This region had been a centre for manufacturing Sue-style stonewares and Haji-style earthenwares from the 6th century ...

Article

Roger S. Edmundson

English ceramic manufactory. The works, near Ironbridge, Salop, beside the River Severn and close to coal resources, were founded by John Rose (1772–1841), a former apprentice at the Caughley works, with backing from Edward Blakeway (1720–1811). After manufacturing from c. 1794...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Flemish sculptor and porcelain modeller. In 1746 he settled in Lunéville (France), where from 1752 he modelled figures for the Lunéville Porcelain Factory (see under Lunéville). He subsequently worked for the porcelain factories at Saint-Clément (1758), Ottweiler Factory (1765) and ...

Article

Derby  

K. Somervell

English centre of ceramic production. A factory producing soft-paste porcelain was in operation in Derby, Derbys, by c. 1750, possibly started by Thomas Briand of the Chelsea porcelain factory. Early output included white cream jugs and some figures that have biscuit visible at the base and are therefore known as dry-edge figures. The main Derby factory was established ...

Article

German ceramics factory. Charles I, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, founded a porcelain factory in Fürstenberg in 1747. Attempts, however, to produce hard-paste porcelain were unsuccessful until after the arrival of the arcanist Johann Kilian Benckgraff (1708–58) from Höchst in 1753. Despite difficult economic circumstances and great technical problems—often the wares became misshapen and cracked during firing, and the glaze was a greyish-yellow—production was extensive from the beginning. Modellers included ...

Article

Georg Germann, Melissa Ragain and Pippa Shirley

Term applied to a style of architecture and the decorative arts inspired by the Gothic architecture of medieval Europe. It has been particularly widely applied to churches but has also been used to describe castellated mansions, collegiate buildings, and houses. The Gothic Revival has also been described by many scholars as a movement, rather than style, for in the mid-19th century it was associated with and propagated by religious and political faith. From a hesitant start in the mid-18th century in England and Scotland, in the 19th century it became one of the principal styles of building throughout the world and continued in some huge projects until well into the 20th century (e.g. ...

Article

Walter Spiegl

German ceramics manufactory. Although Höchst was founded in 1746 by Adam Friedrich von Löwenfinck as a porcelain factory, at first it was only possible to produce high-quality faience painted with enamels. A wide range of wares was produced, including such tablewares as tureens in the shape of animals (...

Article

Gordon Campbell

German porcelain manufactory. In 1777 a porcelain factory was founded in Ilmenau (Thuringia) by Christian Zacharias Gräbner; its products were imitations of wares produced by Wedgwood and Meissen Porcelain Factory. From 1808 to 1871 the factory was known as Nonne and Roesch; in the 20th century it was nationalized under the communists, and is now an independent company. Its products are marked as Grafvon Henneberg porcelain....