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Oscar P. Fitzgerald

American cabinetmaker of Scottish birth. He trained as a cabinetmaker in Edinburgh and London. In 1763 he arrived in Philadelphia on the same boat as John Penn, the new Governor of Pennsylvania and a future client, to join Quaker friends. He opened a shop on Union Street and eventually moved to Second Street in the Society Hill area. He made stylish mahogany furniture (sold ...

Article

Jean-Dominique Augarde

About 1749 he became Marchand Ebéniste Privilégié du Roy Suivant la Cour et Conseils de Sa Majesté. He was active during the reign of Louis XV and was the only French cabinetmaker who was equally competent in both the Louis XV and Neo-classical styles. His pieces were few but of an extremely high standard; he employed fine wood marquetry, Japanese lacquer and Boulle marquetry, as well as producing rigorous bronzes. Although he was little known to the general public of his own day, such leading dealers as ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

German family of decorative designers. Brothers Paul Amadeus (fl 1737–52) and Johann Adolf (fl c. 1743) both worked with the Bavarian court architect François de Cuvilliés on Schloss Brühl, a German Electoral castle halfway between Bonn and Cologne; they worked on the interiors of the Falkenlust (...

Article

Bombé  

Gordon Campbell

Having an outward swelling curve. The term is used with particular reference to French Rococo chests of drawers, which first appear in the bombé shape in the 1740s. The swollen section is normally in the upper half; when it is in the lower half, it is sometimes known as ‘kettle shape’. In colonial America ...

Article

L. Fornari Schianchi

Italian stuccoist, printmaker, painter and collector. Before studying anything else he learned stucco decoration from his father Pietro Luigi (d 1754), who worked in Germany from 1743 until his death. Stucco work always remained Bossi’s main activity, alongside that of printmaking, especially etching. His experiments in the latter field followed in the tradition of the great Venetian printmakers. He was encouraged by Charles-François Hutin, who was in Dresden from ...

Article

French cabinetmaker of German birth. Although nothing is known about his training, he was working in the workshop of Jean-François Oeben when he became the latter’s brother-in-law in 1759. He became a maître-ébéniste on 30 July 1766. He set up a workshop in the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, Paris, and produced luxurious furniture, which was sold by the dealers ...

Article

Bruce Tattersall

English cabinetmaker. It is likely that he was apprenticed to his older brother Otho Channon (bapt 1698; d 1756), a chairmaker, in 1726. By 1737 he had established a cabinetmaking business in St Martin’s Lane, London. A spectacular pair of bookcases at Powderham Castle, near Exeter, Devon, bear brass plates engraved ‘J Channon Fecit ...

Article

James Yorke

English family of cabinetmakers. (1) Thomas Chippendale (i) probably learnt his craft in Yorkshire before establishing a cabinetmaking firm in London in the mid-18th century. His fame rests on his designs for Rococo and Neo-classical furniture. His son (2) Thomas Chippendale (ii) continued to run the family firm into the 19th century....

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Born 1706, in Riedlingnen (Württemberg); died 1777, in Riedlingnen.

Sculptor. Religious subjects.

One of the sculptors of the German Rococo movement. With the cabinetmaker Martin Hermann he made the stalls of the Benedictine abbeys of Zwielfalten ( Scenes from the Life of the Virgin...

Article

Geoffrey Beard

English stuccoist. He is first recorded working in 1740 in Edinburgh for the architect William Adam at Drum House and the palace of Holyroodhouse; his work at the latter has not survived. There are numerous mentions of Clayton in the Hamilton manuscripts at Lennoxlove, Lothian (Box 127), which reveal he was employed in the 1740s by ...