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Gordon Campbell

Ornamental motif (derived from Strapwork) of interlaced bands, used in early 18th-century Germany on furniture, metalwork and pottery.

Article

Term used to describe the continuation in the decorative arts of the Neo-classical style (see Neo-classicism) in France between 1800 and 1805 under Napoleon Bonaparte (First Consul; 1799–1804). His Consulate was an era of renewal in the furniture, porcelain and metalwork industries in France (...

Article

Robin Hildyard

English family of potters of German birth. David Elers and John Philip Elers were the sons of Martin Elers, a German who had settled in Holland. David is first recorded as a silversmith in London in 1686, and both brothers then made ‘Browne muggs and red theapotts’ in Staffordshire and Vauxhall, London, from ...

Article

Hans Ottomeyer

The name derives from the first French Empire under Napoleon I (see Bonaparte family, §1). The dates defining the period of the Empire historically (1804–14) and the duration of the style itself are at variance: the early phase, referred to by contemporaries as ‘le goût antique’, was a late form of Neo-classicism and became more developed as the chaos resulting from the French Revolution subsided ...

Article

Damie Stillman

Architectural and decorative arts style that flourished in the USA from shortly after the acknowledgement of independence in the Treaty of Paris (1783) until c. 1820. The term is derived from the period surrounding the creation of the federal constitution in 1787 and was in use in a political sense by that year. Essentially it was a form of ...

Article

Georg Germann, Melissa Ragain and Pippa Shirley

Term applied to a style of architecture and the decorative arts inspired by the Gothic architecture of medieval Europe. It has been particularly widely applied to churches but has also been used to describe castellated mansions, collegiate buildings, and houses. The Gothic Revival has also been described by many scholars as a movement, rather than style, for in the mid-19th century it was associated with and propagated by religious and political faith. From a hesitant start in the mid-18th century in England and Scotland, in the 19th century it became one of the principal styles of building throughout the world and continued in some huge projects until well into the 20th century (e.g. ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Ewer in the form of a helmet that was made in Germany and France from the early 16th century, both in metal (e.g. Nuremberg) and faience (e.g. Rouen). It was introduced to England by Huguenot silversmiths in the late 17th century. There is a fine example (...

Article

Danish, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1748, in Copenhagen; died 7 January 1828, in Copenhagen.

Sculptor, medallist.

Jesper Holm was a pupil of Johannes Wedewelt. He produced silver medals and works in porcelain.

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Born 11 April 1748, in Hesse; died 23 February 1787, in Brunswick.

Sculptor, medallist.

Krull was a medallist, who occasionally practised sculpture. He produced models for porcelain manufacture, and busts and tombs.

Article

Monique Riccardi-Cubitt

Term loosely referring to a decorative style in France that first emerged in the 1750s and was fully developed before Louis XVI succeeded to the throne in 1774. In 1754 the engraver Charles-Nicolas Cochin II (see Cochin family, §2) appealed to craftsmen for a return to the restraint and discipline of the Antique, an appeal that reflected the larger philosophical and artistic movement of the Enlightenment. Between ...