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Alan Crawford

Informal movement in architecture and the decorative arts that championed the unity of the arts, the experience of the individual craftsman, and the qualities of materials and construction in the work itself.

The Arts and Crafts Movement developed in the second half of the 19th century and lasted well into the 20th, drawing its support from progressive artists, architects and designers, philanthropists, amateurs, and middle-class women seeking work in the home. They set up small workshops apart from the world of industry, revived old techniques, and revered the humble household objects of pre-industrial times. The movement was strongest in the industrializing countries of northern Europe and in the USA, and it can best be understood as an unfocused reaction against industrialization. Although quixotic in its anti-industrialism, it was not unique; indeed it was only one among several late 19th-century reform movements, such as the Garden City movement, vegetarianism, and folksong revivals, that set the Romantic values of nature and folk culture against the artificiality of modern life....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 3 November 1846, in Mattapoisett (Massachusetts); died 15 April 1912, in the sinking of the Titanic.

Painter, medallist, draughtsman, illustrator. History painting, portraits, genre scenes. Murals.

Francis Millet studied in Antwerp under Van Lerins and Keyser, and worked in Europe and the US before covering the Russo-Turkish war and the 1898 war between the US and Spain as a war correspondent. He took part in the Salon des Artistes Français in Paris, won a Silver Medal at the 1889 Universal Exhibition and was a Member of the Jury (representing the US) and hors-concours in 1900. Millet became an Associate of the National Academy in New York in 1882, a Member of the Academy in 1885 and was made a Chevalier of the Légion d'Honneur in 1900....