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Darrell Lewis

Site of Aboriginal culture at Delamere Station, c. 380 km south of Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. It consists of several galleries of paintings and engravings in rock shelters around and near the base of a monolithic sandstone outcrop. Painted motifs include birds, echidnas, kangaroos, a dingo, a Rainbow snake, lizards, a turtle, human figures, hafted stone axes and a European with firearms and cattle. Most of the paintings are silhouettes, either monochrome or outlined with a contrasting colour. Some have additional elaboration, such as internal dividing lines or simple X-ray features. The paintings are probably less than 1000 years old, since the Delamere sandstone is relatively soft. The engravings are abraded, most being randomly orientated, parallel grooves, with some bird and animal tracks and circular pits. These abraded motifs are also unlikely to be very old....

Article

Darrell Lewis

Site of Aboriginal culture, c. 100 km north-east of Broken Hill, in the arid country of western New South Wales, south-east Australia. It is known for its complex of pecked rock engravings; these are concentrated on an area of sloping sandstone pavements (c. 100×30 m), although others are more dispersed. Some are found along an ephemeral creek that leads to the base of the sandstone outcrop where there are several rock holes that provided the Aborigines with a permanent water-supply. The rock holes were discovered by Europeans in the mid-19th century and were visited by several exploring expeditions in the 1860s. Although the engravings are within sight of the water-holes, which were of great importance to European settlers and travellers in the region, they were not documented until the 1920s. The area containing the engravings and other Aboriginal relics was declared a reserve in ...

Article

Andrée Rosenfeld

Site of Aboriginal activity, c. 50 km north-west of Cobar, western New South Wales, south-east Australia. The Cobar Plain is a broad, semi-arid plain south of the Darling River. Intermittent rains have eroded the sandstone to produce short, narrow valleys with low cliffs and rock shelters. Permanent water-holes in the vicinity were important centres for Aboriginal activity with concentrations of campsites and painted rock shelters. Eight of the shelters clustered around Mt Grenfell have paintings; two of the largest also have evidence of habitation....