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Article

Swiss, 19th century, male.

Born in Tafers (Fribourg).

Sculptor.

He was a monk who lived as a hermit at St Theodule near Memberg around 1850. He submitted modelled clay figures to various Swiss exhibitions. It is not known if he studied sculpture before taking orders....

Article

Italian, 19th century, male.

Active in Naples at the beginning of the 19th century.

Sculptor, modeller (porcelain).

Four bisque medallions of the face of Napoleon are attributed to Pietro Paolo Acquaviva. He made them at the royal porcelain factory. Acquaviva was one of the artists who produced the decorations upon the return of the Bourbons to Naples. He was appointed a teacher of sculpture in ...

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1868, in Worcester; died 1947.

Painter. Landscapes.

Harry Adams worked as a decorative artist for the Royal Worcester Porcelain Factory for eight years, before going to study art at the Académie Julian in Paris in 1895. He first exhibited in ...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Born 1840, in Edmonton, Surrey; died 20 June 1906, in Ewhurst Hill, near Guildford.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver. Genre scenes, landscapes, landscapes with figures.

John Clayton Adams exhibited landscapes at Royal Academy exhibitions in London from 1863. He was a member of the New Watercolour Society and the Society of British Artists. He painted landscapes in the South of England....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Name of at least four potters in Staffordshire in the late 18th century and early 19th. The most distinguished William Adams (1746–1805) was the founder of Greengates Pottery, where the design and high quality of his jasper ware has led to the mistaken inference that he had been trained by Josiah Wedgwood; in fact he trained with John Brindley, brother of the canal builder James Brindley. His wares, of which some 300 examples are known to survive, are stamped Adams and Co. Apart from jasper ware, he also made underglaze blue-printed ware. He was succeeded by his son Benjamin, who ran the business until its closure in ...

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Born 1786 or 1787, in Triesdorf near Ansbach; died 1842 or 1850, in Munich.

Painter (including porcelain), watercolourist. History painting, portraits.

He was first taught art by Professor Naumann in Ansbach. Later, around 1811, he worked at the royal manufactory in Nymphenburg, where he was appointed head and inspector of the painting workshop. In his genre, he is considered among the best German masters. His reputation is based mainly on his reproductions of old masters. Notable among his works are some large vases decorated with portraits of members of the Bavarian royal family....

Article

Agano  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese region in Buzen Province (now part of Fukuoka Prefect.), northern Kyushu, where stonewares were manufactured at various sites from c. 1600 (see also Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)).

The first potter to make Agano ware was the Korean master Chon’gye (Jap. Sonkai; ...

Article

Carlos Cid Priego

Spanish sculptor and ceramicist. He moved to Madrid at an early age and was apprenticed to the French sculptor Robert Michel (i), who was employed at the court. He won first prize in a competition at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes, and organized the royal workshop for the carving of precious stones, where he executed two magnificent cameo portraits of ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Slip clay that can produce a dark brown glaze. Albany slip was mined near Albany, NY, from the early 19th century, and was used on American stoneware. It is no longer mined commercially, but is imitated by colouring similar clays.

‘Slip Sliding Away’, Ceramics Monthly...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Spanish pottery manufactory. In 1727 a pottery factory was established in Alcora, in the Catalan province of Castellón (see also Valencia, §3). The most important products of the factory in its early years were plaques and glazed floor titles; the plaques were typically decorated with biblical or mythological scenes set within moulded frames, and the floor tiles used religious motifs (for churches and convents) and secular subjects such as maps and theatrical scenes. Later in the century the factory began to produce tableware, notably fruit bowls, sugar bowls, and pyramidical centrepieces. At the end of the 18th century Italian models were displaced by French design, and the factory began to produce tableware of soft porcelain in the Sèvres style. In this period the factory also started to manufacture the polychrome earthenware terrines known as ...