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Ellen Paul Denker

American potter of German birth. Although originally trained as a weaver, Aust was apprenticed to a potter in Herrnhut, Germany, where the Moravian Brethren were centred. In 1754 he arrived in Bethlehem, PA, the Brethren’s first colonial outpost. After ten months’ work at the pottery there under master ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

English painter and sculptor, active also in America. He worked in porcelain, plaster, and terracotta and after an early career in an artificial stone factory in London he moved c. 1792 to the Derby Porcelain Factory, where he worked as a modeller. In 1816 he emigrated to America, where he contributed architectural decoration to the University of Virginia, including the plaster of Paris friezes for the university buildings and internal plaster and lead ornaments for various buildings....

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American potter and trader. The son of the stoneware potter Anthony Duché (fl Philadelphia, 1700–62), he claimed to be the first person in the West to make porcelain, but he produced only a few curiosities in the late 1730s, described by others as being translucent. No pieces have been positively attributed to him. Before ...

Article

Elizabeth Collard

Canadian family of potters. They were the only family in the history of Canadian ceramics active during three centuries. Five generations worked in Upper Canada (now Ontario): Samuel Humberstone (c. 1744–1823), Thomas Humberstone (1776–1849), Thomas Humberstone jr (1811–95), Simon Thomas Humberstone (...

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American potter. In 1750 he inherited property near the head of Cheesequake Creek, NJ, from his father and from about that time owned a tavern known as Cheesequake Hotel and Morgan House. From about 1754 he also operated in the same location a stoneware pottery, which may have been started in the early 1740s by members of the Dutch ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

American potter. His workshop in what is now Spinnerstown, in Bucks County, PA, made redware decorated with slip applied through a quill. His house and workshop (opposite the Spinnerstown Hotel) are still in the hands of his descendants.