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Italian architect and theorist. He was the son of Antonio Bertotti, a local barber, and Vittoria Scabora; through the patronage of Marchese Mario Capra, an amateur poet and architect, he was able to study architecture in the private school opened in Vicenza in 1748 by Domenico Cerato, and he became curator of the Accademia Olimpica in ...

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Edward McParland

Irish painter and architect. He was the only Irish artist other than Charles Jervas to study at Godfrey Kneller’s Academy of Painting and Drawing, London. Bindon’s family held an estate in Co. Clare, and, like his father and brother, he was MP for Ennis, Co. Clare. He travelled in Italy, had a notable library and was a friend of Jonathan Swift, whom he painted four times between ...

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Edward McParland

Irish architect. He emerged from a background of military engineering to become one of the most prominent architects in Ireland in the first two decades of the 18th century. In 1700 he succeeded William Robinson as ‘Engineer, Overseer, Surveyor & Director Generall of all…Fortifications, buildings’ etc in Ireland, a life appointment with responsibility (not always clearly defined) for erecting and maintaining most government, and some military, buildings....

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T. P. Connor

Scottish architect and writer. He was the key propagandist for the Palladian revival in early 18th-century England (see Palladianism). First as an architectural publisher and then as an architect, he did as much as any contemporary to determine the lines of development of secular architecture for a generation....

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Ivan Hall

English architect. He was the son of Robert Carr, a mason and county surveyor, with whom he trained and later collaborated; together they surveyed the county bridges of West Riding, Yorks, from around 1752. Carr built mostly in the north of England, where his contacts with the county magistrates in Yorkshire and his support for the Whig Party brought him to the notice of influential patrons, who furthered his professional career. This proved to be prolific and wide-ranging. Though it was based on Burlingtonian principles his style was eclectic enough to accommodate Baroque, Rococo or Neo-classical motifs, and he was influenced by his rivals William Kent, James Paine, William Chambers and Robert Adam, although his work is readily distinguishable from theirs. Early houses such as Huthwaite Hall (...

Article

Irish architect of German birth. Around 1715 he was an officer in a regiment of engineers. His Essay on Artificial Navigation mentions that he sailed from Hamburg to Amsterdam, and he evidently travelled in the Netherlands and France. He was in England by 1725, when he was a subscriber to the third volume of ...

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Cinzia Maria Sicca

English 18th-century Palladian villa c. 12 km west of central London in Chiswick, in the Greater London borough of Hounslow. The villa was built in 1725–9 for Boyle family, §2, 3rd Earl of Burlington, to his own designs, in grounds laid out from 1715; the interior decoration and furnishings were largely the work of ...

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Clemens Guido de Dijn

Flemish architect. He probably received his early training in Liège, where he obtained a bursary from the Fondation Lambert Darchis in 1754 to continue his studies in Rome. In 1755 he began working in Rome as a draughtsman for Robert Adam (i), alongside Agostino Brunias and Charles-Louis Clérisseau, Adam’s drawing teacher. Between ...

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Edward McParland

[Daviso de Arcort] Irish architect. He may have been born in Piedmont. He is first heard of in Ireland in the early 1760s and was living in Cork by 1764. He described himself as having been ‘bred…as an Engineer’, and like other 18th-century Irish architects he worked as a canal engineer as well as an architect. He has been described as the last Palladian in Ireland....

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José Eduardo Horta Correia

Italian architect, active in Portugal. He qualified after studying at the Accademia Clementina, Bologna, where he was influenced by the great tradition of the Bolognese school as well as by the Palladianism that was current when he received his artistic and technical training. A visit to Rome was also important; while there he was invited by the Oratorian, ...