1-10 of 12 results  for:

  • American Art x
  • Ceramics and Pottery x
  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
Clear all

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American potter of German birth. Although originally trained as a weaver, Aust was apprenticed to a potter in Herrnhut, Germany, where the Moravian Brethren were centred. In 1754 he arrived in Bethlehem, PA, the Brethren’s first colonial outpost. After ten months’ work at the pottery there under master ...

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American porcelain manufacturer. Gousse Bonnin (b ?Antigua, c. 1741; d c. 1779) moved in 1768 from England to Philadelphia, where he established the first porcelain factory in America with money from an inheritance and with investments from George Morris (1742/5–73). The land was purchased late in ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

English painter and sculptor, active also in America. He worked in porcelain, plaster, and terracotta and after an early career in an artificial stone factory in London he moved c. 1792 to the Derby Porcelain Factory, where he worked as a modeller. In 1816 he emigrated to America, where he contributed architectural decoration to the University of Virginia, including the plaster of Paris friezes for the university buildings and internal plaster and lead ornaments for various buildings....

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American pottery established by William Crolius [Johan Willem Crollius] (b Neuwied, near Koblenz, c. 1700; d New York, c. 1776) and John Remmey [Remmi] (d New York, Nov 1762). Crolius arrived in New York c. 1718 and established a stoneware pottery on Pot-Bakers Hill. Bound by intermarriage to the ...

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American potter and trader. The son of the stoneware potter Anthony Duché (fl Philadelphia, 1700–62), he claimed to be the first person in the West to make porcelain, but he produced only a few curiosities in the late 1730s, described by others as being translucent. No pieces have been positively attributed to him. Before ...

Article

Damie Stillman

Architectural and decorative arts style that flourished in the USA from shortly after the acknowledgement of independence in the Treaty of Paris (1783) until c. 1820. The term is derived from the period surrounding the creation of the federal constitution in 1787 and was in use in a political sense by that year. Essentially it was a form of ...

Article

Elizabeth Collard

Canadian family of potters. They were the only family in the history of Canadian ceramics active during three centuries. Five generations worked in Upper Canada (now Ontario): Samuel Humberstone (c. 1744–1823), Thomas Humberstone (1776–1849), Thomas Humberstone jr (1811–95), Simon Thomas Humberstone (...

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American potter. In 1750 he inherited property near the head of Cheesequake Creek, NJ, from his father and from about that time owned a tavern known as Cheesequake Hotel and Morgan House. From about 1754 he also operated in the same location a stoneware pottery, which may have been started in the early 1740s by members of the Dutch ...

Article

Margaret Barlow

A renewed interest among artists, writers, and collectors between c. 1820 and 1870 in Europe, predominantly in France, in the Rococo style in painting, the decorative arts, architecture, and sculpture. The revival of the Rococo served diverse social needs. As capitalism and middle-class democracy triumphed decisively in politics and the economy, the affluent and well-born put increasing value on the aristocratic culture of the previous century: its arts, manners and costumes, and luxury goods....

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American pottery manufacturer and merchant of English birth. He arrived in Virginia c. 1710, and he was perhaps related to a Lambeth distiller, as his first business in America was a brewery. About 1718–20 he established a pottery at Yorktown, VA. While still operating these two enterprises, he opened a store ...