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Article

Matilde Amaturo

He was the son of the goldsmith Giovanni Bazzani and trained in the studio of Giovanni Canti (1653–1715). Giuseppe was a refined and cultivated artist (Tellini Perina, 1988) and as a young man profited from the rich collections of art in Mantua, studying the works of Andrea Mantegna, Giulio Romano, 16th-century Venetian painters, especially Paolo Veronese, and Flemish artists, above all Rubens. His earliest works, for example the ...

Article

German painter, teacher, draughtsman and printmaker. His frescoes and altarpieces and his teaching established him as the dominant figure in the art life of Augsburg in the earlier 18th century. He came from a family of well-known Swabian sculptors, cabinetmakers and painters, with whom he probably initially trained. The Bavarian Duke ...

Article

Alfonso Rodríguez Ceballos

Italian architect, painter, urban planner and stage designer, active in Spain. He was a pupil in Piacenza of the painters Bartolomeo Rusca (1680–1745), Andrea Galluzzi (fl 1700–1743) and Giovanni Battista Galluzzi (fl c. 1730–40). In 1728 he was one of a number of artists summoned to Spain by the Marchese ...

Article

Sergio Claut

Italian painter and draughtsman. His earliest training was in Belluno with Antonio Lazzarini (1672–1732), the last exponent in the Veneto of Baroque tenebrism. Having moved to Venice, he joined the workshop of Gregorio Lazzarini and later that of Sebastiano Ricci, who was in Venice until ...

Article

Ivo Kořán

Bohemian painter. He was the son of the painter Kristián Grund (c. 1686–1751) and brother to the painters František Karel Grund (1721–43), Petr Pavel Christian Grund (1722–84)—also a violin virtuoso—and the harpist Jan Eustach Grund. He learnt painting with his father, who released him from his apprenticeship in ...

Article

Emilia Calbi

Italian painter. He was trained in Bologna in the school of Carlo Cignani, and his art is rooted in the classicist tradition of Bologna and Emilia Romagna. His achievements can be measured not only by his official appointments (French Academician, 1732; associate and regent of the Congregazione dei Virtuosi al Pantheon, ...

Article

Dwight C. Miller

Italian painter. After initially studying with Aureliano Milani, he entered the studio of Marcantonio Franceschini, whose refined classical style had a decisive influence on his development. His first independent work was the huge Rape of Helen (1723; Bologna, Pal. Mentasti). During the 1730s he proved himself to be a capable practitioner of large-scale fresco painting with his ambitious decoration of the vaults and cupola of S Maria di Galliera, the Oratorian church in Bologna. Franceschini’s influence is particularly evident in Marchesi’s interpretation of Ovidian pastoral myths, where his suave, languorous figures, his comely maidens and scantily clad nymphs represent the transformation of Franceschini’s elegaic classicism into an elegant late Baroque idiom with clear analogies to Rococo. Marchesi was among the more prominent painters in Bologna in the mid-18th century and an active member of Bologna’s Accademia Clementina, which Franceschini had founded. His works must have had a particular appeal to English patrons, as many of them have been discovered in English country-house collections, for example a series of paintings of the ...

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Oreste Ferrari

Italian painter and silversmith. He was important to the history of painting in Naples in the transitional period between the 17th and 18th centuries. His elegant art encouraged the movement away from Baroque drama towards a more tender, rocaille style in harmony with the earliest manifestations in Naples of the Arcadian school of poetry and of the Enlightenment. He painted frescoes, altarpieces and allegorical and mythological pictures....

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Roberto Middione

Italian painter. He was educated initially in the workshop of Domenico Viola at Naples, but in 1708 he entered the school of Francesco Solimena, whose favourite pupil and most trusted collaborator he became. At first he followed closely Solimena’s monumental Baroque manner, as in the frescoes (...

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Bernard Aikema

Italian painter. With Sebastiano Ricci and Jacopo Amigoni he was the most important Venetian history painter of the early 18th century. By uniting the High Renaissance style of Paolo Veronese with the Baroque of Pietro da Cortona and Luca Giordano, he created graceful decorations that were particularly successful with the aristocracy of central and northern Europe. He travelled widely, working in Austria, England, the Netherlands, Germany and France....