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Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1763, in Exeter; died 1851.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver, draughtsman, illustrator. Landscapes with figures, natural history (animals/insects).

John White Abbott took up painting initially as a hobby but became well known for his landscapes with animals and human figures. He was particularly influenced by the lesser Dutch masters, notably Peter de Laes. His work sufficiently impressed contemporaries such as Sir Joshua Reynolds and Benjamin West that they urged him to exhibit at the Royal Academy, and he submitted work to the Academy between ...

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1785; died 8 April 1851.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver, draughtsman, illustrator. Portraits, genre scenes, hunting scenes (hunting with hounds), sporting subjects.

Henry Alken showed two portraits at London's Royal Academy in 1801 and 1802. Alken was first and foremost a painter of hunting and sporting subjects. In ...

Article

American, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1775, in New York; died 17 January 1870, in New Jersey.

Engraver, draughtsman, illustrator.

Alexander Anderson, the son of a Scotsman, was the first person to practise wood engraving in the USA. He first studied medicine and qualified as a doctor in ...

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1752; died 1821.

Engraver, draughtsman, illustrator. Portraits, architectural views, topographical views.

William Angus studied under William Walker and went on to produce a large number of well-executed and pleasing prints of manor houses and family seats in England and Wales. Angus worked as an illustrator and was retained by various topographical publishers of the day. He engraved from his own drawings but also from originals by Shothard, Paul Sandby, Edward Daynes, George Samuel and other leading artists. He is remembered for a series of plates for ...

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Died c. 1817, in London.

Draughtsman, engraver (burin), illustrator.

Van Assen worked in England at the end of the 18th century and in the early years of the 19th. He exhibited occasionally at the Royal Academy between 1788 and 1804...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 1700, in Paris, in 1704 according to some sources; died 1757, in Paris.

Engraver, draughtsman, illustrator. Historical subjects, mythological subjects, portraits.

Michel Aubert was a skilful engraver of portraits, and specialised in this genre, as well as in historical and mythological compositions. He engraved after Watteau: ...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Active in Paris.

Engraver (burin), draughtsman, illustrator.

In 1789, Jean Aubry illustrated a publication entitled: Botany Course for Children by S. A., duke of Orléans ( Le Cours de Botanique pour servir à l'Éducation des enfants de S. A. le duc d'Orléans...

Article

Dutch, 17th – 18th century, male.

Died 18 May 1727, in Sweden.

Painter, engraver, illustrator.

Aveele lived first in Leiden. After the death of Willem Swidde he was summoned to Sweden (1698) to work on the major publication Suecia Antiqua et Hodierna (Ancient and Modern Sweden); this was completed in ...

Article

British, 18th century, male.

Engraver (etching), draughtsman, illustrator.

John Bailey was self-taught but went on to gain fame for his etchings for Hutchinson's Histories of Northumberland and Durham (1781-1784) and Culley's Observations of Life. He is thought to have beeen the author of a decorated book-plate (for Geo. Allan), signed: ...

Article

Dutch painter, draughtsman, calligrapher and printmaker of German origin. He was the son of Gerhard Backhusz. (Backhusen) of Emden, and he trained as a clerk in his native town. Shortly before 1650 he joined the Bartolotti trading house in Amsterdam, where his fine handwriting attracted attention. He practised calligraphy throughout his life (examples in Amsterdam, Rijksmus.; Dresden, Kupferstichkab.; London, BM). During his early years in Amsterdam he also displayed his skilled use of the pen in drawings, mainly marine scenes, done in black ink on prepared canvas, panel or parchment. He probably derived this technique and subject-matter from Willem van de Velde (ii) the elder’s pen drawings of the 1650s. Bakhuizen continued to produce pen drawings until the 1660s, some depicting recognizable ships and existing views, such as his ...