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Article

Morgan Falconer

British painter of Japanese birth. She studied at Wimbledon School of Art, London (1991–2) and Goldsmiths’ College, London (1993–5). Hasegawa came to prominence in the mid-1990s with large cut-out tableaux which bear idealized images of young people. Constructed from MDF and painted in gloss, they resemble displays from store windows. Initially she based her work on images of models that she took from magazines: ...

Article

Phylis Floyd

French term used to describe a range of European borrowings from Japanese art. It was coined in 1872 by the French critic, collector and printmaker Philippe Burty ‘to designate a new field of study—artistic, historic and ethnographic’, encompassing decorative objects with Japanese designs (similar to 18th-century ...

Article

Mitsuhiko Hasebe

Japanese potter, calligrapher and medallist. At an early age he taught himself seal-carving and calligraphy, for which he won a prize in 1904; soon after he became a commercial calligrapher and medallist. In 1915 he had his first experience of decorating pottery at a kiln in the district of Hokuriku. In ...

Article

Liyu  

Robert W. Bagley

Site in Hunyuan County, northern Shanxi Province, China. A tomb or hoard of Eastern Zhou (771–256 bc) bronzes was discovered at the site in 1923. The bronzes (mainly Shanghai, Shanghai Mus.; Paris, Mus. Guimet; Washington, DC, Freer; New York, Met.) include one vessel decorated in red inlay with a turbulent hunting scene and another textured with a repetitive pattern of tiny interlocked dragons in rectangular units. The majority, however, are decorated in low or high relief with horizontal bands of large-scale dragon interlace and are often further embellished with intaglio sketches or modelled figures of such creatures as fish, ducks, and water buffalo. In Western writings about Chinese bronzes the name of the site has been attached to designs of this last type. A large bronze ...

Article

Mingqi  

Gordon Campbell

Chinese funerary wares made from the Han dynasty (206 bcad 220) onward. Most are low-fired ceramic figurines, but there are also models of furniture and household possessions in bronze and pewter.

J. P. Desroches: ‘Trois acquisitions exceptionnelles au muséee national des Arts asiatiques-Guimet: Les sculptures du royaume de Chu (Ve–IIIe siècle av. J.-C.)’, ...

Article

Bent Nielsen

County in Hunan Province, China, west of the city of Changsha. Several remarkable bronze vessels and bells of the late Shang Anyang phase (c. 1300–c. 1050 bc; see China, People’s Republic of, §VII, 3, (ii)) were at various times discovered in the ground or in watercourses in the vicinity of the town of Huangcai in Ningxiang County. Although the site is of the Anyang phase chronologically, the bronzes found there differ stylistically from Anyang bronzes....

Article

Ordos  

Esther Jacobson

Small region contained within the large bend of the Yellow River where it passes through the southern central part of the modern Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region of China. Applied to a particular tradition of metalwork, the term designates the types of objects and the styles associated both with the Ordos proper and with adjoining regions in Inner Mongolia from the late 2nd to the late 1st millennia ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

British painter. She completed a foundation course at Croydon College of Art (1983–4), and a BFA at Goldsmiths’ College, London (1984–7). Her reputation was quickly established; a year after her inclusion in the exhibition Freeze (curated by fellow artist Damien Hirst in ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

Japanese installation artist active in England. She studied painting at the Tama Art University, Tokyo (1985–9), and then moved to London to take a foundation course (1990–91) and complete a BFA at Goldsmiths’ College, London (1991–4), followed by postgraduate study in sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art, London (...

Article

Japanese, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 19 March 1852, in Edo (Tokyo); died 10 October 1934, in Tokyo.

Sculptor. Buddhist subjects. Wood carving, bronze and metalwork.

Takamura Koun exhibited in Paris including at the 1900 Exposition Universelle, where he received a bronze medal. He sought to preserve the art of traditional Japanese wood carving....