1-7 of 7 results  for:

  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
  • Twentieth-Century Art x
  • Architecture and Urban Planning x
  • Interior Design and Furniture x
Clear all

Article

Christian Norberg-Schulz

Norwegian architectural and furniture design partnership formed in 1922 by Gudolf Blakstad (b Gjerpen, 19 May 1893; d Oslo, 1986) and Herman Munthe-Kaas (b Christiania [now Oslo], 25 May 1890; d Oslo, 5 March 1970). Blakstad was awarded his diploma as an architect at the Norwegian Institute of Technology in Trondheim in ...

Article

Nicholas Bullock

Austrian architect, furniture designer and teacher. He trained first in Linz and from 1909 at the Technische Hochschule, Vienna, under the Neo-classicist Karl König (1841–1915). He completed a year in Josef Hoffmann’s studio at the Wagnerschule in 1913–14, and after World War I he returned to work with Hoffmann, rising to be his senior assistant and helping with the development of the ...

Article

Georg Germann, Melissa Ragain and Pippa Shirley

Term applied to a style of architecture and the decorative arts inspired by the Gothic architecture of medieval Europe. It has been particularly widely applied to churches but has also been used to describe castellated mansions, collegiate buildings, and houses. The Gothic Revival has also been described by many scholars as a movement, rather than style, for in the mid-19th century it was associated with and propagated by religious and political faith. From a hesitant start in the mid-18th century in England and Scotland, in the 19th century it became one of the principal styles of building throughout the world and continued in some huge projects until well into the 20th century (e.g. ...

Article

John Wilton-Ely

Term coined in the 1880s to denote the last stage of the classical tradition in architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts. Neo-classicism was the successor to Rococo in the second half of the 18th century and was itself superseded by various historicist styles in the first half of the 19th century. It formed an integral part of ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

German family of furniture-makers, active in Munich. Matthaeus Pössenbacher (fl 1770s) carved furniture for the architect François de Cuvilliés. His grandson Joseph Pössenbacher (1799–1873) founded the furniture factory that supplied the Bavarian court. Joseph’s son Anton Pössenbacher (1842–1920) became cabinetmaker to the Bavarian court, and supplied lavishly upholstered furniture in the style known as German Historicism for the residences of King Ludwig II of Bavaria (...

Article

József Sisa

Hungarian architect, painter and interior designer of German descent. He studied in Karlsruhe and Vienna, and in 1868 he went to Budapest where he worked first in the offices of Antal Szkalnitzky and Miklós Ybl. His designs included the sepulchral monument (1871–2) of ...

Article

Despina Stratigakos

German architect. Winkelmann was the first woman to complete an architectural curriculum at a German institute of technology and the first woman to open an architectural firm in Germany. Her interest in architecture was awakened by her grandfather, who owned a building firm in Aken and under whose tutelage she began her training. When she applied to the architecture programme at the Königliche Technische Hochschule in Hannover, she had already designed houses as well as agricultural and industrial buildings in Aken. Despite her qualifications, as a woman she was not permitted to matriculate, but instead studied as an auditor from ...