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James Smalls

The Black Arts Movement spans the period from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s. Inherently and overtly political in content, it was an artistic, cultural and literary movement in America promoted to advance African American “social engagement.” In a 1968 essay titled “The Black Arts Movement,” African American scholar Larry Neal (...

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 13 January 1937, in Sawyerville (Alabama).

Painter, watercolourist, art historian.

Floyd Coleman studied at Alabama State College, Montgomery, the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the University of Georgia, Athens, where he received his doctorate in 1975. He has taught at Howard University, Washington, DC. At the beginning of his career, Coleman painted brightly coloured abstracts with thick, lyrical calligraphic drawing. After he visited Africa in ...

Article

Adrienne Childs

African American painter, professor of art, art historian, curator and collector. Driskell’s career as an art historian, curator, and practicing artist has been central to the development of the field of African American art. Driskell studied art and art history at Howard University, Washington, DC, between ...

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 7 June 1931, in Eatonton (Georgia).

Painter, draughtsman (including ink), collage artist, print artist, sculptor, collector, art historian. Religious subjects, figures, portraits, figure compositions, scenes with figures, landscapes. Designs for stained glass.

David C. Driskell earned a BFA at Howard University in ...

Article

Theresa Leininger-Miller

Resurgence in black culture, also called the New Negro Movement, which took place in the 1920s and early 1930s, primarily in Harlem, a neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan, but also in major cities throughout the USA, such as Chicago, Detroit, St Louis, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Boston, Atlanta, and Washington, DC, as well as in the Caribbean and in Paris. Better known as a literary movement because of the publication of twenty-six novels, ten volumes of poetry, five Broadway plays and countless essays and short stories, the Harlem Renaissance (a term that historian John Hope Franklin coined in ...

Article

American, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1948, in Ohio.

Painter, lithographer, art historian.

AfriCobra Group.

Michael D. Harris studied at Howard University, Washington DC, before earning a PhD from Yale University. He is a member of the group AfriCobra (African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists), which promotes an art in the service and for the advancement of the Afro-American community. He began teaching at the University of North Carolina in ...

Article

American, 20th century, female.

Born 27 February 1924, in New Orleans.

Painter, draughtswoman, watercolourist, print artist (including linocuts), sculptor, art historian. Figures, portraits, genre scenes, landscapes.

Samella Lewis studied with Elizabeth Catlett at Dillard University, New Orleans, and Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia. In 1951 she obtained her doctorate from Ohio State University, Columbus, the first African-American woman to receive her doctorate in art history and fine art. In ...

Article

Dennis Raverty

African American painter, writer, film production designer, and multimedia installation artist. Marshall’s works portray idealized subjects derived from African American experience in large-scale, multiple-figure paintings and installations that share many characteristics with European history painting in the “grand manner” of Peter Paul Rubens, Benjamin West...

Article

James Smalls

Philosophical position and cultural movement in which the goal was to promote a public image of African Americans as industrious, urbane, independent, distinct and apart from the subservient and illiterate “Old Negro” of the rural South. The term and the concept evolved over the years to become important to the African American scene during the first three decades of the 20th century. The New Negro was self-sufficient, intellectually sophisticated, creative, knowledgeable and proud of his/her racial heritage. The expression “New Negro” first appeared during the Reconstruction era following the Civil War and was generally used to describe a person of African descent who was no longer willing to comply with the dominant white culture. During the late 1800s, those who promoted Booker T. Washington’s proposals for economic advancement of African Americans often used the phrase “New Negro.” However, the influential black author and sociologist W. E. B. Du Bois interpreted Washington’s philosophy as one of black accommodation of white racism. In his ...

Article

Nikki A. Greene

American art historian, critic, educator and painter. Porter greatly influenced African American art and scholarship. He immediately began teaching art at Howard University, Washington, DC, upon graduation in 1926. He later continued his art training in New York, where he worked toward a degree at Teachers College and enrolled at the Art Students League in ...